Takeouts: Businesses Profit off the Bad Economy, NCAA Championship Predictions

Monday, April 05, 2010

  • BUSINESS:  A little-known company in St. Louis has come to dominate a thriving industry by helping employers process, fight and beat unemployment claims. New York Times reporter Louise Story explains how the TALX Corp. is turning a busted economy into a booming business model.
  • SPORTS: Which of the two finalists, Butler or Duke, will bring home the national championship? Takeaway sports correspondent Ibrahim Abdul Matin previews tonight's big college basketball game.

Guests:

Ibrahim Abdul-Matin and Louise Story

Produced by:

Hsi-Chang Lin

Comments [1]

Kristi from Maplewood, New Jersey

Huge Fan of the show – However I was really disappointed in today's story from Louise Story -what was the point exactly? Was the point that company's should pay for unemployment benefits for people who are not entitled to them? The Wal-Mart example only had one side of the story - who really knows the exact reason why any person is dismissed? Companies won't and should not comment on an employee’s circumstances for leaving. Why should people who are dismissed for cause or quit be entitled to unemployment benefits? Talx is there to protect companies for paying when they are not legally obliged to do so.

If we want a society that pays unemployment benefits to everyone – then fine – let’s have that discussion; but be clear that is not how our unemployment tax structure is currently set up – Talx corporation has nothing to do with that. Let’s talk about countries who have those enhanced unemployment benefits – like in Denmark or France and see if it makes sense for us in the US – Let’s discuss what is the best way to support all out of work Americans – no matter how they got there - that would be a good discussion and Take Away.

Apr. 05 2010 11:28 AM

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