Violence Escalates in Egypt With Pro-Morsi "Massacre"

Wednesday, August 14, 2013

The scene at Rabaa's frontline. (Mosa'ab Elshamy/Twitter)

Violence in Egypt is escalating as Egyptian security forces clash with supporters of ousted President Mohamed Morsi.

Egyptian military forces cleared out two pro-Morsi camps in Cairo overnight, and there are reports of armored vehicles, bulldozers and tear gas being used by government forces against the supporters. There are also unconfirmed reports of dozens of fatalities. Muslim Brotherhood officials are calling the situation a "massacre."

David Kirkpatrick, who is in Cairo for our partner the New York Times, is describing a sense of the chaos on Twitter:

 

Kirkpatrick also says the number of dead bodies in a makeshift morgue nearby rose from three to 12 in the 15 minutes he was there—these reports are backed up by pictures of what appear to be dozens of dead bodies.

It would appear the violence is not restricted to the capital. Churches have reportedly been set on fire in other parts of the country. So far appeals for calm are being ignored. Kirkpatrick says that Egypt's most respected Muslim cleric, the Imam of Al Azhar, has made a televised statement calling for an end to the violence.

Louisa Loveluck, a freelance reporter based in Cairo filing for the Global Post, explains the situation on the ground.

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Comments [1]

listener

Peace and Development?

Wasn't Sadat a dictator who started the Yom Kipper War and did make peace with Israel after getting the Sinai back from Israel and billions of dollars from the USA? Didn't he lose his life at military parade honoring that October 1973 war against Israel and gave us Mubarack as the new dictator?
Apparently one must be a university professor to understand this praise.

Aug. 14 2013 09:16 AM

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