The Story Behind Snowden's Leaks

Wednesday, August 14, 2013

The NSA whistleblower and former agent of CIA & NSA, Edward Snowden. (Laura Poitras/Praxis Films/Shutterstock)

Documentary filmmaker Laura Poitras, along with columnist Glenn Greenwald, helped Edward Snowden expose the NSA.

Peter Maass, an investigative reporter, decided to write a profile of Poitras for the upcoming issue of The New York Times Magazine. In the course of reporting his profile of Poitras, Maass was able to conduct an encrypted question-and-answer session with Edward Snowden, for which Poitras served as an intermediary. The full transcript of that conversation can be viewed here.

Here Maass tells the story behind Snowden's leaks and how he was able to communicate with the international fugitive. 

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Guests:

Peter Maass

Produced by:

Ibby Caputo

Editors:

T.J. Raphael

Comments [1]

Khursh Mian from New York

"Here Maass tells the story behind Snowden's leaks and how he was able to communicate with the international fugitive." Really? "international fugitive"? More like persecuted whistle blower. Or persecuted American citizen, or persecuted witness to crimes being committed against the American public by criminal goverment players who are systematically violated the United States Constitution, specifically its forth amendment proscription against:
Amendment IV
The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.

Edward Snowden is a true patriot. A true American hero who has sacrificed his freedom and liberty to warn the citizenry of America of the crimes being committed against them by the former Bush and the current Obama administrations combined.

Aug. 15 2013 12:07 PM

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