Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder: A Biography

Monday, August 05, 2013

A demonstration of a life-like simulator that represents a new form of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder treatment. (U.S. Army/flickr)

In this first installment in The Takeaway's series on post-traumatic stress disorder—commonly referred to as PTSD—we look at the disorder through multiple lenses. 

David Morris is a former Marine and the author of the upcoming book, "The Evil Hours: A Biography of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder."

After returning from Iraq in 2004, he describes feeling a "sense of disconnection" and realizing he "wasn't the same person." This personal experience with PTSD inspired his research into the disorder. His new book aims to bring together both psychiatry and the history of PTSD. 

Morris joins us to discuss his personal experience with PTSD, as well as in the context of psychology, medicine, and literature. 

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Guests:

David Morris

Produced by:

Jillian Weinberger

Editors:

T.J. Raphael

Comments [3]

Ellie

Hey, check out this book on posttraumatic stress -To Soften the Blow! http://youtu.be/De-7d8653gU

Aug. 06 2013 01:51 PM
Sredni Vashtar from the Shed Out Back

I agree. Unfortunately, The Takeaway resorts to such gimmicky things all too often, and Hockenberry likewise comes across as a hack. Shows like Radiolab and This American Life can be even more gimmicky, but their substance and story-telling ability more than make up for it, IMO. I listen to The Takeaway only as a space-filler until a better show comes on, in my listening area, The Brian Lehrer Show.

Aug. 05 2013 05:42 PM
Buck from Minneapolis

The dramatization of breathing behind Hockenbery's voice on the intro to the PTSD piece was tacky, and cheapens what he was saying; the topic is grim enough without the idiotic theatrical get-a-reaction-at-all-costs introduction. Cut the crap.

Aug. 05 2013 04:21 PM

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