Taking a Trip to Saturn, at The Speed of Light

Tuesday, July 30, 2013

A montage of images of the Saturnian system prepared from an assemblage of images taken by the Voyager 1 spacecraft during its Saturn encounter in November 1980. A montage of images of the Saturnian system prepared from an assemblage of images taken by the Voyager 1 spacecraft during its Saturn encounter in November 1980. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/NASA)

For as long as humans have had imaginations, we’ve imagined ways of going faster: On trains, in planes, and in stories of gods and superheroes.

For decades, comic book heroes have been able to travel at the speed of light, leaving the rest of us behind in the dust...until now.

If Harold G. White gets his way, we’ll all eventually be traveling at the speed of light. White is a physicist and advanced propulsion engineer at NASA. He has been given a green light to begin looking at how we might move through space at what amounts to faster than the speed of light. 

Stay up to date with The Takeawaybecome a Facebook fan & follow us on Twitter!

Guests:

Harold G. White

Produced by:

Kristen Meinzer

Editors:

T.J. Raphael

Comments [1]

Jerrold Richards from Lyle, Washinton

If this experiment works. If it works. Whew. This would be up there with the development of the wheel, with the telegraph, with ... with ... well frankly it would be so huge that I can't really compare it to anything. That said, I do think we need to do more work in the area of playing nice, while of course being able to take care of ourselves. My concern is not that it is a lonely vacuum out there. Quite the contrary, my concern is that we will make it out there and find a bunch of No Trespassing signs, and various parties who might not be thrilled if we behave too arrogantly.

Jul. 30 2013 12:55 PM

Leave a Comment

Register for your own account so you can vote on comments, save your favorites, and more. Learn more.
Please stay on topic, be civil, and be brief.
Email addresses are never displayed, but they are required to confirm your comments. Names are displayed with all comments. We reserve the right to edit any comments posted on this site. Please read the Comment Guidelines before posting. By leaving a comment, you agree to New York Public Radio's Privacy Policy and Terms Of Use.