Senator Rand Paul on NSA & Military Sexual Assault | Mandela Day In South Africa and the U.S. | New Breakthrough for Down Syndrome

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Thursday, July 18, 2013

Senator Rand Paul on the NSA Scandal & Military Sexual Assault | Mandela Day In South Africa and the U.S. | New Genetic Therapy Provides Breakthrough for Down Syndrome | What Not to Read | "Dear Malala"—A Letter From a Senior Pakistani Taliban Leader | A Look at What Went Wrong With School Meals in India

Senator Rand Paul on the NSA Scandal & Military Sexual Assault

Kentucky Republican Senator Rand Paul is backing New York Democrat Kirsten Gillibrand in her effort to curb sexual assault cases inside the military. Paul’s backing could prove critical as Gillibrand attempts to build support for her bill, which will be offered as an amendment to the annual Defense Authorization Act. The Kentucky senator says he sees “no reason why conservatives shouldn't support” Gillibrand’s measure. He joins The Takeaway to discuss his reasons for backing the measure.

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New Genetic Therapy Provides Breakthrough for Down Syndrome

Every year, 6,000 American babies are born with an extra copy of chromosome 21, the genetic cause of Down Syndrome. But this week, doctors at the University of Massachusetts Medical School announced a breakthrough that could have significant implications for how we treat the disease. 

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What Went Wrong With School Meals in India?

It's a story that has scandalized India—a free school lunch program for poor children may have resulted in the death of more than 20 young students.The possibility of deliberate contamination, or at best reckless disregard of the safety of children, is being reported. Joining us to discuss this is Shoba Narayan a freelance journalist based in India.

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"Dear Malala"—A Letter From a Senior Pakistani Taliban Leader

In October 2012, 16-year-old Malala Yousafzai was shot in the head by the Taliban. During her recovery, she received thousands of cards and letters from around the world. In a letter sent to Malala on Tuesday a senior Taliban leader, Adnan Rasheed, wrote he was shocked when hearing of the attack and "wished it had never happened". Nonetheless, he condemned the young girl of "running a smearing campaign" against the Taliban. Today on The Takeaway, we examine the controversial letter.

On October 9th, 2012, 16-year-old Malala Yousafzai was shot in the head by the Taliban. During her recovery, she received thousands of cards and letters from around the world. In her recent speech at the United Nations, Malala acknowledged how positive an impact the love and support of these people have had on her. 
In a letter sent to Malala on Tuesday, which was obtained by Channel 4 News and other news organizations in the United Kingdom, senior Taliban leader Adnan Rasheed wrote he was shocked when hearing of the attack and "wished it had never happened". Nonetheless, he condemned the young girl of "running a smearing campaign" against the Taliba

In October 2012, 16-year-old Malala Yousafzai was shot in the head by the Taliban. During her recovery, she received thousands of cards and letters from around the world. In a letter sent to Malala on Tuesday a senior Taliban leader, Adnan Rasheed, wrote he was shocked when hearing of the attack and "wished it had never happened". Nonetheless, he condemned the young girl of "running a smearing campaign" against the Taliban. Today on The Takeaway, we examine the controversial letter.

 

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Mandela Day In South Africa and the U.S.

Today, Nelson Mandela’s birthday, is also known as “Mandela Day.” It's a day when people are encouraged to volunteer 67 minutes of their time - that's one minute for each year that Mandela served others in South Africa, while in prison and in politics. Sharing what Mandela Day means at home in South Africa, and abroad, are Anders Kelto, reporter for PRI's The World, and Ntshepeng Motema, a South African living in New York.

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What Not To Read

It’s the time of year when many of us find ourselves on the beach, or in a park, or on the back porch with a tall glass of something cool and a delicious summer read. But while many of us dive into our summer reads, more than a few of us also set those books down before finishing them. What makes a book hard to finish? And which books—especially in the sultry days of summer—just aren’t worth the effort? Patrik Henry Bass, books editor for Essence, shares his very special list of what not to read this summer.

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