Dozens Dead in Cairo as Military Clashes With Opposition, What Went Wrong on Asiana Flight 214, The Dreams of a Man in Solitary Confinement for 40 Years

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Monday, July 08, 2013

Verrazano-Narrows Bridge (Joe Mazzola/Wikipedia Commons)

Dozens Dead in Cairo as Military Clashes With Opposition | Egypt's Mystery Man: Who is Adli Mansour? | U.S.  Infrastructure 80 Years After the Public Works Administration | The Dreams of a Man in Solitary Confinement for 40 Years | Looking at What Went Wrong on Asiana Flight 214 | Secretive Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court Sees Role Expanding

At Least 50 Dead in Cairo as Military Clashes With Opposition

More than 40 people have been killed in a shoot out today near military barracks in Cairo. The Muslim Brotherhood says its members were staging a sit-in outside the facility where they believe former President Mohamed Morsi is being held. Bloody photos and video images appeared on television and social media showing several bodies lying on the ground, and doctors and medical personnel attending to the wounded. Joining us to discuss this Kristen Chick, reporter for the Christian Science Monitor. She is on the ground in Cairo.

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Egypt's Mystery Man: Who is Adli Mansour?

In Egypt, the man tasked with bringing a semblance of stability to an unstable situation is the nation's Chief Justice of the Supreme Constitutional Court, Adli Mansour. But he’s being called a mystery man and an unknown quantity. Mona El-Naggar is a documentary filmmaker, journalist and former Cairo reporter for our partner The New York Times. She recently helped profile Mansour for the Times and fills us in on who he is and what he might be able to do.

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Secretive Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court Sees Role Expanding

New information is out on the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (FISA), which operates in secret and approves government surveillance programs—including the two revealed by leaker Edward Snowden. The court's role is expanding to more than just surveillance programs. Eric Lichtblau is a reporter in the Washington Bureau for our partner The New York Times. He's reported on these broad expansions of the FISA court for the paper and joins The Takeaway to discuss this expansion of powers.

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Spitzer Looks for Comeback With Run for NYC Comptroller

In New York, a once-disgraced politician is trying to be the next comeback kid. Last night, former New York Governor Eliot Spitzer announced his candidacy for New York City Comptroller. Governor Spitzer discussed his candidacy on our co-producer WNYC's program, The Brian Lehrer Show, earlier today. Brian Lehrer joins us to discuss these candidates looking for a comeback.

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Looking at What Went Wrong on Asiana Flight 214

Following the crash landing of Asiana Flight 214 that was travelling from Seoul, South Korea to San Francisco, details are now emerging about went went wrong abroad the Boeing 777, and the errors that may have been made by the flight crew. The 11-hour journey is reported to have gone relatively smoothly as the 291 passengers traveled across the Pacific. That is until the very last few moments. The Takeaway examines what went wrong on Asiana Flight 214.

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The State of U.S. Infrastructure 80 Years After the Public Works Administration

The Public Works Administrations was the driving force of America’s biggest construction effort to that date. 80 years later, the American Society of Civil Engineers gives the United States a D+ grade on infrastructure and 1 in 9 bridges are structurally deficient. Ed Rendell is the former governor of Pennsylvania and the founder and co-chair of Building America’s Future, which advocates for infrastructure spending. He believes that the United States has delayed investing in infrastructure long enough.

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'Herman's House': The Dreams of a Man in Solitary Confinement for 40 Years

Artist Jackie Sumell was outraged when she learned that a Louisiana state prisoner named Herman Wallace has lived in solitary confinement 23 hours a day for more than 40 years now. He is believed to be the longest-serving prisoner in solitary confinement in the United States. Angad Balla's documentary airing tonight on PBS, "Herman's House," follows Jackie as she raises awareness of long-term solitary confinement through art.

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