Protests Continue in Egypt As Demands Grow for Morsi to Step Down, Snowden Pulls Request for Russian Aslyum, Yarnell Hill Wild Fire Leaves Residents Displaced

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Tuesday, July 02, 2013

A general view shows Egyptian anti government protesters praying at sunset on Cairo's Tahrir Square, on February 7, 2011, on the 14th days of protests calling for an end to Hosni Mubarak's regime. (MOHAMMED ABED/AFP/Getty Images/Getty)

Protests Continue in Egypt As Demands Grow for Morsi to Step Down | Snowden Pulls Request for Russian Aslyum | The Yarnell Hill Wild Fire Leaves Residents Displaced And In The Dark | Tulsa 2024: The Real Plan to Make OK the Home of the Summer Olympic Games | The Economics of Food: Cookbooks and Global Development | Takeaway Host John Hockberry Checks in From Africa | New Report Shows Church Shielded Funds From Clergy Victims

Protests Continue in Egypt As Demands Grow for Morsi to Step Down

After millions took to the streets on Sunday, protests continue in Egypt where hundreds of thousands continue to demand the ouster of the democratically elected President Mohamed Morsi. Omar Khalifa is the director of Egypt’s O Media and was skeptical of President Morsi’s regime from the beginning. He's been participating in the protests in Egypt that he says are overwhelming in scale. Khalifa joins The Takeaway to discuss the protests and the possible next steps in Egypt.

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Takeaway Host John Hockberry Checks in From Africa

Takeaway Host John Hockenberry is in southern Africa all this week and is looking at the economic realities on the ground there. In townships where the economy and putting food on the table are daily concerns, people in southern Africa are looking beyond symbolic leadership in the hopes of seeing real change.

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Snowden Pulls Request for Russian Aslyum

Edward Snowden remains in a transit area in the Moscow airport, but he has abandoned his request for asylum in Russia after Russian President Vladimir Putin said asylum would only be granted if Snowden ceases leaking classified information against the United States. Ellen Barry, Moscow Bureau Chief for our partner The New York Times, and Kimberly Marten, Political Science professor at Barnard College, join The Takeaway to discuss Putin's decision and the possible next steps for Snowden.

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Tulsa 2024: The Real Plan to Make OK the Home of the Summer Olympic Games

Tokyo, Rio, Athens, London and Sydney: What do these cities have in common? They’ve all hosted the modern Olympic games. And if Tulsa (yes, that Tulsa—the one in Oklahoma) has its way, it will soon join this prestigious list. Neil Mavis is spearheading the effort to make Tulsa the home of the 2024 Summer Olympic Games. And as he sees it, Tulsa isn’t just up for the task, it has more to offer than any other city in the world.

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The Yarnell Hill Wildfire Leaves Residents Displaced And In The Dark

It's been a devastating week for the residents of Yarnell, Arizona. The entire town has been evacuated after a raging wildfire destroyed hundreds of homes and took the lives of 19 firefighters. Yarnell Church Pastor Paul Jones, has been counting the seconds until he can reunite with his community and offer refuge for those needing relief. Pastor Jones joins The Takeaway to discuss the wildfire that is engulfing more than 8,300 acres.

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New Report Shows Church Shielded Funds From Clergy Victims

Timothy Dolan, the archbishop of New York, has long been considered one of the "good guys" of the Catholic Church. But new documents released this week by the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Milwaukee paint a different picture of Dolan, who formerly served as archbishop there. Laurie Godstein broke this story yesterday. She is the national religion correspondent for our partner The New York Times and she joins The Takeaway to discuss these recent revelations.

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The Economics of Food: Cookbooks and Global Development

Having a large amount of diversity in our food can enrich our lives. But how come it's so hard to find cookbooks and restaurants that serve more exotic cuisines? Economist and author Tyler Cowen argues that it is global development and standardization that is keeping us from having a larger amount of options for food.

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