Drought in New Mexico Town Leaves a Village Without Water

Wednesday, June 19, 2013

Camel hunters arrive back at desert camp after the hunt. (Mike Dupuy Falconry)

The recent drought hitting the Southwest caused the small town of Magdalena, New Mexico to completely run out of water. How did the town survive without water? What can we learn about our water consumption habits that can better prepare us droughts in the future?

Magdalena, a village in Socorro County New Mexico has a small population of around 1,000 people. This month, the town ran out of water. Residents only had 24 hours of notice before the tap water was turned off.

Magdalena was under a "boil alert" because the supply of water coming into households was dangerously low. Some businesses had to shut their doors, health clinics could not properly function, and some residents had to leave the town entirely.

Then the town's sole drinking water well went dry, leaving the town without any water.

Senior Field Correspondent for Fronteras, Monica Ortiz Uribe, went to Magdalena and got a chance to speak to the locals about the drought. She produced a piece for Fronteras called "New Mexico Town Offers Glimpse Of Life Without Water" and shares with us how the town has survived without water.

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Guests:

Monica Ortiz Uribe

Produced by:

Ally Harrison and Mythili Rao

Comments [2]

Emily AJ from Boston, MA

What a rock star piece of radio! Who could have possibly produced such a steller segment? Ahh! I see - Ally Harrison, I should have guessed!

Congrats dear!

Jun. 19 2013 07:01 PM
Peg

...issues with drought and reduced water supplies will continue to plague the western states. Which is why the Great Lakes and Northeastern States with plentiful pristine water must protect our Most Important resource. Making sure our laws protect our water is essential for the well being of our entire country.

Jun. 19 2013 09:42 AM

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