Overpopulation of Prisons, The History of Privacy & Democracy, Will Snowden Be Extradited?

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Tuesday, June 18, 2013

Extradition or Rendition: How Will the U.S. Get Snowden Back on U.S. Territory? | Will Edward Snowden be allowed to stay in Hong Kong? | Transparency, Secrecy and Freedom: The History of Privacy and Democracy | Supreme Court Invalidates Arizona 'Proof of Citizenship' Policy for Voter Registration | P is for Prison: Sesame Street and Overpopulation in America's Jails | Kambiz Hosseini: Iran's Jon Stewart on the Presidential Elections| G.O.P Reopens Fight on Abortion Limits to Court Conservative Base

Extradition or Rendition: How Will the U.S. Get Snowden Back on U.S. Territory?

The Los Angeles Times has reported that officials are trying to move as quickly as possible, to prevent Snowden from leaking any more information. The question is, how exactly will they have Snowden returned to the U.S.? Extradition? Or some other method? Ashley Deeks, a University of Virginia law professor and former State Department adviser on matters of extradition, explains the Obama administration's options.

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Will Edward Snowden be Allowed to Stay in Hong Kong?

Hong Kong could be the center of an international legal battle now that NSA-leaker Edward Snowden has announced his intentions to stay in the city. Though it maintains a judiciary, media, and educational system of it's own, the city is technically part of China, and has an extradition agreement with the U.S. Emily Lau, chairwoman of Hong Kong’s Democratic Party, explains the political pressures Hong Kong's leaders expect to face should the U.S. make a move to extradite him.

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Supreme Court Invalidates Arizona 'Proof of Citizenship' Policy for Voter Registration

On Monday, the Supreme Court ruled against Arizona state's Proposition 200—a law that required would-be voters to indicate proof of citizenship before being eligible to vote. Arizona sate legislators and Attorney General Tom Horne defended such procedures as measures to counteract voter fraud. Kareem Crayton, University of North Carolina law professor, weighs in on what this ruling really means

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G.O.P Reopens Fight on Abortion Limits to Court Conservative Base

House Republicans are gearing up to reopen the fight on abortion limits—even if a new bill has no chance of passing. G.O.P congressional representatives are introducing a new bill today that would prohibit women from having an abortion after 22 weeks of pregnancy, an effort that is seen as one of the most restrictive pieces of abortion legislation to be voted on in the last decade, and one that would not get past Democrats in the Senate, or the White House. Molly Ball, political writer for The Atlantic, weighs in on this legislation and it's deeper meaning.

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P is for Prison: Sesame Street and Overpopulation in America's Jails

One in twenty-eight children in America has a parent behind bars. And now, for the first time, a muppet does too. Last week, the beloved children's program Sesame Street announced a new initiative entitled "Little Children, Big Challenges: Incarceration." Mike Riggs, an associate editor at Reason magazine, blogged about the topic last week, writing "Congratulations, America, on making it almost normal to have a parent in prison or jail."

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Kambiz Hosseini: Iran's Jon Stewart on the Presidential Election

Kambiz Hosseini has been called the Jon Stewart of Iran. In his weekly persian-language podcast, "Five in the Afternoon," he satirizes the politics and culture of his home country, highlighting the often-tragic issues facing Iran with humor. Hosseini weighs in on the Iranian presidential elections last week and what the loss of Ahmadinejad will mean for his comedy.

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Transparency, Secrecy and Freedom: The History of Privacy and Democracy

As we learn more about the National Security Agency's secret surveillance programs and leaker Edward Snowden, The Takeaway is looking at freedom in America, and freedom's relationship to privacy. Jill Lepore, New Yorker staff writer and professor of American history at Harvard University, explores the relationship between privacy, government transparency and freedom in U.S. history.

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