Pushing for More Transparency in Bradley Manning Trial

Tuesday, June 04, 2013

More than three years after his arrest and after months and months of pretrial hearings, the trial of Army Private Bradley Manning finally began this week at Fort Meade.  Manning is accused of releasing more than 700 thousand classified government files to the website WikiLeaks.  He has been charged with aiding the enemy and with violating the Espionage Act, among other things. In total he faces 22 charges.

The trial is open but following the details of what is being argued presents something of a challenge because so much of it is shrouded in secrecy. Motions, briefs, and transcripts of pre-trial hearings have not been released, making it hard for the press and public to follow the proceedings. The non-profit Freedom of the Press Foundation crowd-funded almost $60,000 to pay for two court stenographers to sit in the media room, but they were not granted a press pass.
Shayana Kadidal, Senior Managing Attorney at the Center for Constitutional Rights, is among those pushing for greater transparency in this trial. In late May, the CCR filed a complaint and motion for preliminary injunction asking for access to the government’s filings, the court’s orders, and transcripts of the proceedings. 

Guests:

Shayana Kadidal

Produced by:

Mythili Rao

Comments [2]

David Allen from Interlochen, MI

Every now & again I stumble onto your coffee clutch chatter & am amazed that it endures...for today some report discussing the manning case mentioned the " ME-LAY" court martial...did that take place before or after the My Lai (ME-LIE) court martial. The press thinks it needs shield laws...but people working in it under 50 yrs old need to historical & cultural literacy. Why wasn't he corrected on the air? Politeness can condone ignorance & allow it to perpetuate. Apparently mediocre is the new good.

DA

Jun. 04 2013 11:20 AM
listener

"The government" euphemism is better known as the
Obama administration?
Not in keeping with the progressive narrative which may
account for the lack of media interest.

Jun. 04 2013 09:14 AM

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