New Report: Women are Increasingly Breadwinners

Wednesday, May 29, 2013

single mother mom (Matthew Kenwrick/flickr)

A new report by the Pew Research Center finds that 40 percent of households with children under the age of 18 include mothers who provide the sole or primary source of income for the family. In 1960, that figure was 11 percent.

Bryce Covert is the Economic Policy Editor at ThinkProgress. She breaks down the Pew Research Center's findings.

Guests:

Bryce Covert

Produced by:

Tyler Adams

Comments [1]

Victoria

As a single mother who is the sole support for my daughter, I am curious about the depth of PEW's research. I consider myself the sole support because I receive $107/month from my daughter's father. Since the economic collapse I have heard of many single mothers in a similar situation as myself. The fathers of our children have gone underground. My ex collected unemployment for two years while working under the table. He found this worked so well for him that although the economy is starting to improve he continues to get paid under the table (approx. $50,000/year) so he doesn't have to pay the full amount of support. I know that I am not alone going through this situation. At my work alone there are 4 other single mothers that have ex-construction workers doing the same thing. Has PEW researched this area of single parent support?
I am not looking for a hand out or wanting to take advantage of her father or social benefits. I volunteer at my daughter's school twice a week, I'm a college student with 3/4 time status and an A average, as well as working to support my daughter and I. I feel that a non-custodial parent should assist in financially supporting the welfare of the child(ren). Is there anybody who researches this are of single parenthood? A few parents have reported their situations, with great detail, to the IRS without any result. This may be a great area to develop additional information on the economics of single parenthood.

May. 29 2013 04:25 PM

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