One Step Closer to Dark Matter, Mining Haikus, Plagiarism

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Thursday, April 04, 2013

The International Space Station (NASA/Wikimedia Commons)

Have Scientists Finally Found Dark Matter? | New Algorithm from the Times Finds Haikus 'In the Wild' | Is This Plagiarism? | The Solutionism Trap

Is Increased Communication the Secret to Deescalating North Korea?

Here's a recipe for global domination: Insult nearly all of your neighbors, cancel a cease fire, promise to teach lessons to old enemies, and then turn New York City into a sea of fire.

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Have Scientists Finally Found Dark Matter?

Dark matter makes up more than 80 percent of the matter in the universe. But up until now, it’s eluded scientists. Yesterday, however, NASA announced a possible breakthrough. A particle detector mounted on the International Space Station may have detected dark matter. Theoretical physicist Michio Kaku explains.

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Is This Plagiarism?

From a very young age, we’re told to be honest, to tell the truth, and not to cheat. In most cases, we know when we’re breaking those rules. But in others, it’s not always so clear. Take, for example, journalism in the digital age.

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New Algorithm from the Times Finds Haikus 'In the Wild'

The New York Times’ latest technological gadget is the haikubot, a poetry-seeking piece of software engineering that combs the text of every New York Times article as it’s published in search of the 5-7-5 syllable pattern that identifies a haiku.

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Dementia Is Getting Really, Really Expensive

Think about this: Nearly 15 percent of people aged 71 or older, about 3.8 million people, have dementia. By 2040, that number will balloon to 9.1 million people. And costs are expected to rise accordingly.

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The Solutionism Trap

Technology can turn dry reporting into poetry and can revolutionize newsrooms, but it can drive us crazy — and make us less unproductive too. Evgeny Morozov says the trouble might not be in the technology itself,  but how we think about it.

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