Today's Takeaway | February 19, 2013

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Tuesday, February 19, 2013

Mapping the Brain to Better Understand Ourselves | Chinese Hackers Linked to Government | Understanding the Brains of Mass Killers | Is Mary Jo White a Tough Cop or a Wall Street Insider? | Economic Equality Still Eludes Women as 'Feminine Mystique' Turns 50 | How to Emerge from Default and Debt: Lessons from Cleveland

Mapping the Brain to Better Understand Ourselves

President Obama has proposed a brain mapping project to help us understand a bit better what's going on inside our noggins. Dr. Rafael Yuste is a neuroscientist at Columbia University and one of the coordinators of the Obama administration's new Brain Mapping Project. But how can it be done? And are there any real-world benefits to doing it? Gary Marcus is someone who understands the challenges and possibilities that spring from these kinds of projects. He's a cognitive psychologist at NYU and blogger for the New Yorker. 

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Report: Chinese Hackers Linked to Government

Today an American computer security firm, Mandiant, released a detailed 60-page report linking members of one of China's most sophisticated cyber espionage units directly to the Chinese military. David E. Sanger, chief Washington correspondent for The New York Times explains the implications of this report.

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Is Mary Jo White a Tough Cop or a Wall Street Insider?

President Obama's nominee to head the Securities and Exchange Commission, Mary Jo White, continues to receive praise and criticism for her background. By some, she's hailed as the tough prosecutor who took down John Gotti and a laundry list of most-wanted terrorists. But White has also come under fire for her connections to big banks. Peter Henning is a law professor at Wayne State University. Formerly, he was a Senior Attorney with the SEC's Division of Enforcement.

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Understanding the Brains of Mass Killers

What compels a person to open fire upon innocent people? In a new documentary produced by NOVA, journalist Miles O'Brien investigates how far nueroscientists have come in determining what makes the brain of a violent adolescent different than that of a normal brain.  

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Economic Equality Still Eludes Women as 'Feminine Mystique' Turns 50

Today, Betty Friedan's "The Feminine Mystique," the book that sparked the feminist movement of the 1960s, celebrates its fiftieth anniversary of publication. Stephanie Coontz, author of "A Strange Stirring: The Feminine Mystique and American Women at the Dawn of the 1960s," argues that Friedan succeeded in revolutionizing American attitudes about gender, but that concrete policies to enable gender equality in the home and the workplace have stalled.

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How to Emerge from Default and Debt: Lessons from Cleveland

In December 1978, Cleveland, Ohio became the first in the United States to default on its debts since the Great Depression. In the next few days, Detroit will decide whether to appoint an emergency manager for the bankrupt city. Thomas Sugrue, professor of History and Sociology at the University of Pennsylvania, explains what lessons Detroit should learn from the history of Cleveland's default and recovery.

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