Sequestration Could Jack Up the Price of Meat

Monday, February 18, 2013

The sequester had Washington, D.C on edge last week, with likely cuts threatening to put countless federal employees out of work. That includes a large majority concentrated in the D.C. area. While the cuts haven't come yet, Takeaway political correspondent Todd Zwillich reports that the sequester deadline will probably come and go, automatically enacting those across-the-board spending drawdowns. 

But cuts will have a wider reach, affecting many industries throughout all parts of the United States. For example, the USDA will likely have to furlough many of their food inspectors. And if farms and factories can't be inspected, they can't produce meat. Ranchers close their gates, and the price of bacon goes through the roof. Mark Dopp is Vice President of Regulatory Affairs at the American Meat Institute.

Guests:

Mark Dopp and Todd Zwillich

Produced by:

Joe Hernandez

Comments [2]

dlmc from Brooklyn

There are NO CUTS. The budget simply will not increase- that may be a Washington cut, but in the rest of the country it is status quo. If government workers agreed to a freeze - wouldn't no jobs have to be cut? Some legitimate reporting would be interesting. Doesn't it become tiresome just functioning as Obama administration agitprop.

Feb. 18 2013 02:11 PM
listener

The hysteria has begun.
Millions for Presidential vacations and billions of admitted waste
but no money for meat inspectors?
Clearly Pelosi, Reid and Obama should have passed a budget after
spending trillions in 2010 like they were supposed to which was the root
of this crisis. The media loves to ignore that significant history.

Feb. 18 2013 09:34 AM

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