Will Obama Go for Climate Change Legislation Alone?

Wednesday, February 13, 2013

A mother bear and two-year-old cub drifting on glacier ice. From Arctic Obsession, by Paul Nicklen. (Paul Nicklen)

In the last few years, climate change became an almost taboo subject in Washington, but Hurricane Sandy, record-breaking heat, and other mercurial weather patterns may have altered public perception when it comes to the environment. 

President Obama addressed climate change in his State of the Union address last night. While the President may have the public on his side, legislation to combat the problem has gotten so little traction in Congress, environmental activists wonder how the Obama Administration can achieve his goals when it comes to the environment. 

Coral Davenport, energy and environment correspondent for the National Journal, believes the president will likely sidestep Congress altogether in the climate change fight. She explains how the president can use executive orders to reach his environmental goals. 

Guests:

Coral Davenport

Produced by:

Jillian Weinberger

Comments [2]

rolf niebergall from Floral Park, LI/NY

the carbon based energy is more than 100 years old. It is time to have an other source of energy. "Green Energy", maybe, is the solution. If we are really exceptional we should we should be # 1 but we are not!

Feb. 19 2013 06:17 PM
Larry Fisher from Brooklyn, N.Y.

Climate change has smacked this country around with increased surprise weather; Hurricanes in areas like New York that never got hurricanes before, snowstorms in the south who didn't know what a sled was till now, tornadoes touching down outside of tornado season. Hey, even if the President can convince a stubborn Senate that climate control exists, can it be turned around?

In other words: Is there still time to return the climate to what it was? Or should Midwestern farmers who suffered the worst drought in fifty years start thinking of moving North to Canada to start growing corn?

Feb. 13 2013 01:55 PM

Leave a Comment

Register for your own account so you can vote on comments, save your favorites, and more. Learn more.
Please stay on topic, be civil, and be brief.
Email addresses are never displayed, but they are required to confirm your comments. Names are displayed with all comments. We reserve the right to edit any comments posted on this site. Please read the Comment Guidelines before posting. By leaving a comment, you agree to New York Public Radio's Privacy Policy and Terms Of Use.