Tech Has Revolutionized Everything Else — Why Not Government?

Wednesday, February 06, 2013

Government is often imagined as slow-moving and bureaucratic — particularly when it comes to technology and innovation. Yesterday, White House chief technology officer Todd Park tried to debunk that view, describing his position as a "tech entrepreneur-in-residence," who is "effectively running an incubator inside government."

Yet technology-driven innovation can do much more for government, argues John McGinnis, author of "Accelerating Democracy: Transforming Governance Through Technology" and law professor at Northwestern University. McGinnis explains why he believes the federal government should legalize internet gambling on legislative outcomes, harnessing data to test social policy and much more.

Guests:

John McGinnis

Comments [2]

Angel from Miami, FL

Slow and steady wins the race. That's why we've had one government since the start whilst so many businesses have gone under. Mr. McGinnis is under the delusion that data-streams (like revenue-streams) is a predictor of social trends. Having legal gambling on law-making results to poll where Americans stand on the issues is like believing that the stock market is fair to everyone when only a select few can get involved in IPOs. Most of America is out of the electronic loop. [pause] And for those of you who muttered some elitist slogan during that pause you couldn't be further from the truth. The US is not a place for an aristrocracy... not even an electronic one.

Feb. 06 2013 10:33 AM
Theo Gantos from Flint,MI

Gort Klaatu barada nichto to John's question about Robots controlling democracy. Who controls the robot code?

Feb. 06 2013 09:57 AM

Leave a Comment

Register for your own account so you can vote on comments, save your favorites, and more. Learn more.
Please stay on topic, be civil, and be brief.
Email addresses are never displayed, but they are required to confirm your comments. Names are displayed with all comments. We reserve the right to edit any comments posted on this site. Please read the Comment Guidelines before posting. By leaving a comment, you agree to New York Public Radio's Privacy Policy and Terms Of Use.