Harvard to Conduct $100 Million Study to Make Football Safer

Thursday, January 31, 2013

NFL Logo on the astroturf. NFL logo on the astroturf. (Jonathan Moreau/flickr)

In recent years a lot of attention has been focused on the health risks that N.F.L. players face, especially with concussions and brain injuries, but the range of health problems that current and former players experience are far more extensive.

Now the union representing N.F.L. players has chosen Harvard University to lead a $100 million study to research, treat, and eventually attempt to limit and prevent injuries and other long-term health complications for its members.

Dr. Lee Nadler is co-director of the study and dean for clinical and translational research at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Nadler says the the aim of the study is to evaluate the "true health, of the whole player, in their whole life."

Guests:

Dr Lee Nadler

Produced by:

Elizabeth Ross

Comments [2]

Larry Fisher from Brooklyn, N.Y.

In the end people will be told that when they have head injuries do not play. So, people will not reveal their head injuries and take their chances.

Jan. 31 2013 02:49 PM
Chris from Eugene,Ore.

John, Fab show man! It would be great not to have football! Hey let's face it's the Roman Gladiator's all over. Controlled violence with all this manly bravado rolled in. Not for sissies,huh. Plus it's a chance through out the season to be a teen again and self medicate.
We've made it a multi- billion dollar business. So even if the study finds it's killing players...well we all know the power of Money.
Switch to soccer would be great but we have such a strong pride of authorship or are we just lame!?

Jan. 31 2013 01:42 PM

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