Linking Violence and Biology Through DNA

Friday, December 28, 2012

What happens in the brain of a mass killer that permits such violence to occur?

In an attempt to answer this question, researchers at the University of Connecticut are preparing to carry out what may be the first extensive study of the DNA of a mass murderer. 

The genome of Newtown, Connecticut shooter Adam Lanza will be mapped in an effort to find mutations linked with increase risk for extreme violence. The decision to do so has pitted the ethical and scientific consequences of the research against one another.  

Dr. Paul Appelbaum practicing psychiatrist and professor of psychiatry, medicine, and law at Columbia University explains the process.

 

Guests:

Dr. Paul Appelbaum

Produced by:

Ellen Frankman

Comments [3]

Larry Fisher from Brooklyn, N.Y.

I doubt that anything will be found by fiddling around with Adam Lanza's brain, but it will give people something to do and make people think that they are doing something positive, so... it can't hurt... not unless they decide they need to experiment on brains that are still alive.

Dec. 28 2012 04:55 PM
Jf from Ny

You are confused because this is a diversion by mkultra. Be afraid of each other not the statistical personal cause of your death by corporations poisoning your food and planet, and cars, and starvation.

Dec. 28 2012 03:30 PM
Matt Martin from Portland, OR

I suspect that Adam was teased relentlessly while he attended grade school, most likely Sandy Hook Elementary. We as a society can't accept that we are to blame, at least partially, for this tragedy. Allowing bullying & teasing in our schools to continue along with the inability to catch mental illness early will only produce more of these monsters.

Matt

Dec. 28 2012 01:36 PM

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