What It Means to Be a Woman with a Gun

Friday, December 21, 2012

For decades, firearm manufacturers have capitalized on associating guns with masculinity. The gunmaker Bushmaster recently came under criticism for a macho ad campaign that equates gun ownership with earning one’s "Man Card."

But a recent Gallop poll proves that it’s not just men who are buying guns. Gun ownership among women is at an all time high—43 percent report having a gun in their home. That’s not far off from the 52 percent of men who claim household gun ownership.

Women own guns for many of the same reasons men do—for hunting, for protection, and for collecting – but they are often treated differently, even within the gun-owning community.

Jessica Gonzalez and author Porochista Khakpour join us now to discuss what it means to be a woman with a gun.

Guests:

Jessica Gonzalez and Porochista Khakpour

Produced by:

Ellen Frankman

Comments [5]

Paul Dichtel from Las Vegas, Nevada

I do not believe that Americans ought to give up their right to own weapons. I am sorry, but there is too much corruption at the higher levels of power in this country, and citizens owning weapons may not protect us from dishonest people running our country, but at least they have to think about the people getting sick and tired of their financial trickery. A citizenry without weapons won't have any power at all in my opinion, but we are pretty much enslaved and controlled already.

Dec. 22 2012 05:38 AM
Catherine Spencer-Mills

Do you have a redecorating budget? If you shoot someone in your home, be prepared to repaint, recarpet and reupholster. I had a neighbor shoot her boyfriend by accident. There were little pieces of his leg on the ceiling and walls. When my uncle had a bleeding ulcer and woke up projectile vomiting blood, my aunt had in the professional cleaners. Then she had the bedroom, hall, and bath repainted and recarpeted since the smell and stains lingered. Save up if you have a gun for "self-defense" for that new carpet you have been wanting.

Dec. 21 2012 01:15 PM
Larry Fisher from Brooklyn, N.Y.

Eventually, schools will get rid of teachers and just have armed security guards babysitting our kids watching videos...So, since women haven't gone on any mass murder shootings in this country, let's make all armed security guards women...
I know longer know where my jokes begin or end

Dec. 21 2012 12:15 PM
Carolyn

My father was a gun collector and had a lot of passion about his right to own and carry guns. I was introduced to guns at a young age and thought they were fun until I really understood the energy around them. I do not own any guns, and I do not plan to ever own a gun. I travel in a small RV and don't feel any need to carry a gun. I believe owning a gun puts you in an energetic place of fear. Even if I were to be hurt or killed in an event of violence against me because someone else had a gun, I would be glad I didn't contribute to that act of violence by using a gun.

Dec. 21 2012 11:21 AM
Janet Humphrey from NYC

When you asked Jessica if she feared the government taking her gun away, I wish you had brought up the real issue: how does she feel about having reasonable controls, regulations and requirements on gun ownership, including banning assault weapons and ensuring that all gun buyers pass background checks. Under these circumstances, responsible gun owners like Jessica would still get to have their guns, yet she and all of us would be safer, including our children.
There is zero chance that the government will abolish gun ownership, and no one is even proposing that, not even the Brady Campaign, yet it is this ramped up fear that keeps us stuck, unable to pass reasonable laws - as we have for driving, registering vehicles, buying alcohol, and so many other things.
So if you had focused on the real issue I think this would have been more illuminating and potentially more useful in refocusing the discussion on the actual issue: sane regulation.
I hope you cover this in the future.
Thank you.

Dec. 21 2012 09:49 AM

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