Today's Takeaway | November 14, 2012

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Wednesday, November 14, 2012

General David Petraeus (Joshua Treadwell/U.S. Navy)

Military Marriages: Does a Higher Set of Standards Apply? | American Energy in the Age of the Superstorm | Angering Miami Marlins Fans with Big Trades | 'The Patriarch': The Complicated Legacy of Joseph P. Kennedy | David Petraeus and the Military's Culture of Celebrity

Military Marriages: Does a Higher Set of Standards Apply?

As General David Petreaus’s marital infidelity comes to light and his storied career comes to an end, questions have arisen about his marriage, his life in the military, and whether members of the military are — or should be — held to a higher standard than the rest of us.

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American Energy in the Age of the Superstorm

If recent storms spark a renewed interest in combatting climate change, we could see a resurgence of the national gas industry. Jeffrey Leonard, the CEO of the Global Environment Fund, a growth capital-oriented investment firm, explains.

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Miami Marlins Deal Away Their Star Players

Just a year after receiving an enormous amount of public funding to build a new stadium in Little Cuba, and spending lavishly on MLB free agents such as Jose Reyes, the Marlins completed a trade with the Blue Jays yesterday that sent any remaining members of the team making big salaries away to Toronto, in exchange for mediocre players and cheap deals. Needless to say, their fans aren't so pleased.

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'The Patriarch': The Complicated Legacy of Joseph P. Kennedy

Joseph P. Kennedy, the powerful patriarch of the Kennedy dynasty, died in 1969, but the legacy he left behind has continued to fascinate, and puzzle, historians as well as his own descendants. David Nasaw cuts through the myth surrounding the elder statesman in his new biography, "The Patriarch: The Remarkable Life and Turbulent Times of Joseph P. Kennedy."

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David Petraeus and the Military's Culture of Celebrity

In all the news surrounding General David Petraeus’s resignation, there’s a central question about military culture itself. As Petraeus implemented his counter-insurgency strategy in Iraq, and then Afghanistan, he became a celebrity, an old-school military hero who seemed to have all the answers to America's messy conflicts abroad. Wired Magazine's Spencer Ackerman describes this as the 'Cult of David Petraeus.'

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