David Frum on Yesterday's Election

Wednesday, November 07, 2012

GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney speaks after conceding the race to President Barack Obama. (STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images)

This election will be examined for years to come by strategists and historians. While an incumbent president can usually rely on running on a successful record and the presidency itself, some say that was not an option for Obama.

According to David Frum, what the Obama campaign did was perhaps even more effective. Frum is a Republican strategist and the author of a Newsweek/Daily Beast book coming out this Friday called "Why Romney Lost and What the GOP Should Do Next."

The Democrats' success, according to Frum, was due in part to the strength of their ground-game organization, which allowed the party to overcome the poor state of the economy. The Republican's inability to reach outside of their shrinking base further bolstered Obama's means to victory.

"The Republicans had a tough night last night, and I think the full magnitude of the toughness is going to sink in," said Frum.

Now, without the means to stop ObamaCare and to prolong Bush-era tax cuts, the Republican Party will be forced to rethink its strategy. The idea that all the Republicans need to do relax on immigration and secure the Latino vote to their coalition is false. Rather, the GOP must to re-base itself.

"The Republican Party has to reinvent itself as the party of the American middle class," said Frum. 

Guests:

David Frum

Produced by:

Ellen Frankman and Rebecca Klein

Comments [1]

Larry Fisher from Brooklyn, N.Y.

The President needs to get the message out that the new Economy no longer will be a traditional blue collar job. Americans need to know that the new jobs will be grounded in technology and all employees will have to have Science and Math knowledge...I know, it sucks!

Nov. 07 2012 01:44 PM

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