A Democratic Politician Turned Republican Star

Thursday, August 30, 2012

In 2008 former congressman Artur Davis gave a rousing speech at the Democratic National Convention seconding the nomination of then presidential candidate Barack Obama. On Tuesday night, Artur Davis spoke again at a party convention, but this time for the Republicans, in firm opposition to his former friend. 

The former co-chair of the Obama campaign is not the only politician to switch party allegiances this election cycle, as former Republican Governor Charlie Crist will be speaking in a few days at the Democratic National Convention. Now, both parties are embracing their new-found supporters as fearless truth-tellers. 

Davis tells The Takeaway what made him switch sides, and why it is consistent with his views. He also assails Obama for straying "too far to the left."

 

Guests:

Artur Davis

Produced by:

Rebecca Klein

Comments [9]

Larry Fisher from Brooklyn, N.Y.

Ouch!

Aug. 30 2012 08:48 PM
Wendy from New Jersey

Artur Davis is looking for his next job, and clearly doesn't care about who, what or where.

Aug. 30 2012 03:33 PM
Charles

No, Angel; Artur Davis was at the convention to prove that not all black people were "drowning" while the Republicans had a party.

You see how the slime game works, Angel? You try to slime the Republican convention with some off-topic and inconsequential story, and I come right back and slime the left-wing media the same way.

Give me a heads up on the next slime attack, and I'll be happy to be there to repsond in kind.

http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2012/08/29/yahoo-news-reporter-fired-over-black-people-drowning-comment/

Aug. 30 2012 01:02 PM
Angel from Miami, FL

Clearly, Artur Davis was at the RNC to feed on nuts he knew Republicans would be throwing at him. A free meal is a free meal - not even the airlines give out free nuts.

Aug. 30 2012 11:19 AM
anna from new york

There is a difference between just a Governor and a campaign manager.
Well, Obama was elected by ... the Republicans and illiterate, primitive, hypocritical "liberals."
I knew that. Everyone normal didn't vote for "Hope, unity, change." y

Aug. 30 2012 09:35 AM
Charles

Well, I can hardly wait for John Hockenberry to do an equivalent interview with the failed Florida Senate candidate, Charlie Crist, during the Democrats' convention.

I am particularly looking forward to John popping the same question about gay marriage.

Aug. 30 2012 09:18 AM
Peg

Unlike membership in the Democratic party, non-white opportunists have a much better chance of being prominent, publicly featured and nationally recognized when they join the sparse ranks of 'minorities" in the GOP.

Aug. 30 2012 08:56 AM
Martin from New York

After Artur Davis was beaten in the 2010 Democratic gubernatorial primary in Alabama, he bitterly refused to endorse the Democratic nominee. He wrote an op-ed in his hometown newspaper, the Montgomery Advertiser, saying "the forces that dominate my party have turned into the same conservative anti-reform elements I went into politics to oppose. " So how can we take him seriously when only two years later, he's become a drum majorette for what has become the most conservative iteration of the Republican Party in recent political memory? The Washington Post quoted his op-ed in a 2010 article in which some observers branded him a sore loser.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/08/20/AR2010082004221.html

Aug. 30 2012 07:42 AM
martin from New York

Only two short years ago, Artur Davis bitterly denounced his Democratic rival after losing the 2010 Alabama gubernatorial primary, saying his party had been hijacked by the "same conservative anti-reform elements that I went into politics to oppose." Now that he's been courted by the Republicans, he's saying the Democratic party is too liberal. This guy is an opportunist fraud.

Aug. 30 2012 07:21 AM

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