The All Male Presidential Election of 2012

Tuesday, August 14, 2012

Hillary Clinton delivers remarks with U.S. Secretary of Treasury Tim Geithner. (Paul J. Richards/Getty)

In 2008, with Hillary Clinton's presidential campaign and Sarah Palin's vice presidential candidacy, having a female in The Oval Office seemed just around the corner. Yet, with Governor Mitt Romney's choice of Paul Ryan for vice president, we are once again looking at an all-male ticket.

Is there hope for women in 2016? Former ABC news correspondent Lynn Sherr explains.

Guests:

Lynn Sherr

Produced by:

Rebecca Klein

Comments [6]

You have a woman presidential candidate in 2012, of the Green Party.
How myopic of Lynn Sherr to only look to the Republicrat Duopoly for candidates!
Or is it just part of her brainwashing?
Or is she just part of our brainwashing?

Aug. 14 2012 03:49 PM
Charles

Find us an American Margaret Thatcher, and I will campaign for her.

Aug. 14 2012 03:48 PM

The first woman to receive an electoral vote was Libertarian Toni Nathan for Vice President, in 1972.

Aug. 14 2012 03:44 PM
listener

Spare us the smug lectures. Only liberal/leftist women need apply and all other women and their families will be viciously pilloried by "progressives".

Aug. 14 2012 10:17 AM
dlm

Lynn Sherr should not presume to speak for all women. The number of "liberal" women who made statements that Palin should stay home with her baby was disgraceful. To bad dems do not see the "war on women" language as the insult that it is. It presumes women to be weak creatures incapable of self reliance. Not unique individuals with differing ideas on the healthcare, employment and taxes.

Aug. 14 2012 09:51 AM
Carole from Florida

You all are forgetting the name of the real likely winner of the presidential and congressiona contests.....Wall street/Goldman Sachs.

Aug. 14 2012 09:31 AM

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