Are Robots the Future of Telecommuting?

Tuesday, August 14, 2012

Robots have long been part of the American imagination. But as reporter Rachel Emma Silverman recently discovered, robots may soon be part of the American reality… in the workplace. 

Rachel writes for the New York-based Wall Street Journal, but she lives in Austin, Texas. Rachel reports on developments in the American workplace, and recently she decided to try a new development herself. For a few weeks this summer, Rachel telecommuted to her New York offices as a robot, QB-82.

"During my robot days, I interacted with co-workers I'd never met before, as well as others I hadn't talked with in years; each of them was compelled to greet me as I cruised down the hall," Rachel writes. But, of course, QB-82 also had its downside: "I also nearly careened into glass walls, got stuck in an elevator, could barely hear the discussions in story meetings and got little other writing or interview work done while botting into the newsroom," she explains.

 

Guests:

Rachel Emma Silverman

Produced by:

Jillian Weinberger

Comments [2]

thatgirl from manhattan

you let this conversation go on far too long; not only because it's not something a single end-user can bring value to, but because ms. silverman's voice is so wholly grating that my husband and i turned it off.

Aug. 14 2012 03:48 PM
Larry Fisher from Brooklyn,N.Y.

"I think I'll send my robot out to the bar for some drinks and see if there are any cute robot chicks out there to hook up with..." that my friends is the future...

You meet someone online, and you send out your robot to meet them face to face... to see if you want to meet them face to face...

I can see a 12 step program for people who only let their robots go outdoors... Will the robot go to the meeting or the fragmented human? Robots Anonymous

Still, I'd love to have a robot go pick up milk and eggs in the morning

Aug. 14 2012 08:34 AM

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