Want to Survive in the Digital Age? Learn to Code.

Tuesday, August 07, 2012

laptop computers (Klein Photography/flickr)

According to Alasdair Blackwell, everyone should be bilingual. He's the director and co-founder of Decoded, a company that offers workshops that teach people to code in one day. He proposes that computer coding be a mainstay on elementary school curricula from now on, as computers become a more integral part of our lives and as our relationship with them grows deeper.

Professional programming is difficult, Blackwell says, but learning the basics can be a huge asset to children who want to make the web work for them, instead of standing by as a passive user. Decoded is beginning to host pop-up workshops across the world, spreading the gospel of code to any willing participants. 

Guests:

Alasdair Blackwell

Produced by:

Joe Hernandez

Comments [2]

Nancy W from Northville, MI

Having paid vacation is great, IF you are able to take it and/or enjoy it. Whether you bring along your smart phone and respond to emails from colleagues or work on future lesson plans for school, your time off may really include much time "on." Many may find it difficult to get away, despite earning many weeks of paid vacation, either because they have developed work-aholism or their supervisors express dismay or disappointment that they plan to leave work for any length of time. It may take a culture shift to really enjoy vacation.

Aug. 08 2012 09:03 AM
Larry Fisher from Brooklyn, N.Y

In some ways I liked life better when I just had a typewriter. I just wrote. Then I had to learn Word, and how to make a website.

Learning how to make life easier with Computers will take forever... there will always be a new language to learn before I can get back to writing

Where is that typewriter?

I want to write a story about a guy who turns his computer into a Doctor who can give him a full Physical as well as Psychological examination... Oh they are working on that app?
Appsolutely

Aug. 07 2012 09:07 AM

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