A Conversation with Your 12-Year-Old Self

Tuesday, July 10, 2012

Filmmaker Jeremiah McDonald of Portland, Maine, is the creator of the latest viral sensation where he sits down for a conversation with his 12-year-old self.

What would you say to your 12-year-old self? We speak to five listeners: Bob from Rhode Island, Mike from Massachusetts, Jessica from Philadelphia, David from New York, and Glenn from Michigan.

To leave your comment, call 1-877-8-MYTAKE or post a comment below.

 

Produced by:

John Light and Brad Mielke

Comments [10]

Rachelaliza from Manhattan

I would tell her to cherish her father, because he wont be around forever. To tell him she loved him more often. And to try harder in gym because her metabolism will grind to a halt as she gets older.

Jul. 10 2012 04:01 PM
Kellyn from Harlem, NY

I'd tell my 12 yr old self to love & believe that little voice, follow your intuition. Know you are beautiful that disappointment's not a curse, trust it as a guide.

Jul. 10 2012 03:53 PM
sarah

Life will turn out the way you make it. People will hurt you. You will make mistakes. its ok. study become a professional and look for happieness and success for Yourself.
Now @ 26 married, working full time, and a third baby on the way: i wish i knew some of this and took more control of my destiny. I let alot of people around me make decisions and influence my path inlife. I regret not following my dreams.

Jul. 10 2012 12:10 PM
katebenet from Boston, MA

Marry well the first time. Trying to do so the second time around is infinitely harder with kids, assets, step kids, ex's, etc. Plus, divorce is, in hundreds of ways, so much more painful than anyone can ever convey.

Jul. 10 2012 12:01 PM
Larry Fisher from Brooklyn

Dude, you are on the right track. You know how you took twenty dollars in 1969, when you were 9 years old and you went to the head shop in Monticello and bought all the old Woodstock posters for a quarter each after the festival? Well, your Danny Partridge mentality was correct. They are worth a lot more now. You got to make sure mom doesn't throw out all the collectible stuff you are buying...

also, you know how you stole the silver coins to buy old baseball cards... Well, you were right the old rookie cards of Mantle and Mays are worth way more than the value of the silver coins. Keep stealing

Jul. 10 2012 09:48 AM
Kim from New York, NY

When I was 12, I thought being smart was uncool, especially for girls, so I tried to make myself "less smart" by intentionally answering test questions wrong. I feel like that put me on a path that was hard to correct and led me to not work as hard in junior high & high school.
So I would tell my 12 yr old self that being smart is a good thing, don't think girls shouldn't be smart or that it's not cool. Be confident of your strengths and don't try to be something you are not.

Jul. 10 2012 09:20 AM
Peg from Southern Tier NY

Don't let your parents' and grandparents' desires for your adult profession become your duty. Notice the direction of your own interests and aim for your own dreams.

Jul. 10 2012 09:12 AM
Christopher Anderson, MaleSurvivor from NYC

I would tell my 12 year old self that the sexual abuse he survived was not his fault, that there are millions of others who have gone through what he went through, and that it is absolutely possible to heal. I wish that I had learned that lesson long before I started my healing journey at 30.

Jul. 10 2012 09:06 AM
Ed from Larchmont

The best advice is to remain celibate until marriage: you will avoid a host of troubles. Go out in groups, don't date singly, develop skills and study. You will be a gift to your spouse, for one thing.

Jul. 10 2012 08:11 AM
Emile Lamah from Bronx, New York

I would tell him to limit his student loan to a reasonable amount. To do so, he should go to a community college and avoid those private schools that are in the business of putting students in debt, not educating them.

Jul. 10 2012 07:41 AM

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