The Takeaway's Musical Road Trip: Brooklyn with Reggie Watts

Monday, July 09, 2012

This summer, The Takeaway is embarking on a virtual road trip around the country to some of America’s greatest music cities. Our tour guides will include some of the most popular recording artists and experts from each town. And we want you to be a part of it. Call 877-8-MYTAKE to nominate the music city that you think should be a stop on our virtual road trip. Or write us at Facebook.

We’re kicking off the series today in the great city of Brooklyn, New York. Our tour guide will be one of our favorite comedians and musicians: Reggie Watts. Watts' second stand-up special, "Reggie Watts: A Live at Central Park" is now available on DVD and CD from Comedy Central Records. 

Bands featured on this stop of the road trip include: Le Sphinxx, They Might Be Giants, Chairlift, and of course, Reggie Watts.

 


 

We asked you who we should visit on our tour. Check out the map below to see what you, and everyone else, said.

Click here for a larger map.

 

Guests:

Reggie Watts

Produced by:

Jay Cowit and Kristen Meinzer

Comments [6]

Danny Tamez from Asbury Park NJ

Hey,
One of the most vibrate music scenes with a long history of great artists is Asbury Park NJ!!!! Bruce! Need I say more!

Jul. 26 2012 02:03 PM
BB

What was the band called,"les finks"?

Jul. 09 2012 10:06 AM
Larry Fisher from Brooklyn

New York has always been called a melting pot, but when it comes to music, New York has been melting gold for decades.
The city is historically rich with creators of all types of genres;

Where did all the great Jazz musicians end up?
Louis Armstrong, Charlie Parker and a hundred other Jazz greats all landed in New York and called it home...So, you have Louis who is the most important musician of the 20th century landing in Queens, and Parker the creator of Be-Bop living in the East Village. That alone should qualify New York as the most important musical city but there is more.

How about the Brill building where people like Carol King, Neil Diamond and Lou Reed ended up writing pop songs, till Lou broke out and helped create a new genre of music called Punk in the seventies...

That Brill building in Manhattan dominated the music scene from the beginning of Tin Pan Alley throughout the sixties and into the seventies.

Punk is not to underestimated either. Even the shittier bands in Brooklyn, all try to cop their attitudes from Punk...

The City still thrives on music. We have nothing else. We are broke and dying. Music is our last gasp in Brooklyn.

The city still has new music scenes in Country, Hillbilly and Bluegrass. In fact the city has a scene for whatever kind of music there has ever been. There is still a Punk, Hardcore, New Wave, No Wave, Electronica etc.

Oh, and the Classical musical scene still seems to have a thrust on the rest of the world.
There are many great music cities throughout the country but all the best musicians end up in New York for at least a brief period of time. The city and it's stress make these musicians better musicians and if they can survive the high rents and stress, it will make them crazy enough to make fantastic music, till they have to get the hell out. Hell it even puts them out on the street busking for a buck. What a way to learn your chops and find out about the street, and how the world works. Life experience has to influence musicians music, doesn't it?

The rest of the world can come up with new sounds, but the musicians will all come through New York for at least a minute, or at least dream about it.
New York is still where you dream about making it and meeting the other "real deal" musicians. It just is.
I am a born and bred New Yorker lucky to have been raised in the music capital of the world.
There are many great towns for music but New York is where people came and where against all odds still come

Jul. 09 2012 10:02 AM
fuva from harlemworld

Yes, I think this is not really debatable. Course, there are many cities that can claim a blues-based hometown musical hero of serious country/world-wide influence. But do any really compare to Detroit? Here's game-changing musical product feverently celebrated across all barriers and strata -- race, age, nationality, language, ethnicity, geography, class. I could go on. (And we won't even get into Aretha.)

Jul. 09 2012 09:45 AM
Nik

...plus, come on, Chicago is home to supercool Blues giants Muddy Waters, Koko Taylor, Buddy Guy...too many to list!
Catch the Chicago Blues Festival next year in June
http://www.explorechicago.org/city/en/supporting_narrative/events___special_events/special_events/mose/chicago_blues_festival.html/

Jul. 09 2012 09:04 AM
Nik

Too bad you missed Summerfest in Milwaukee...maybe next year if you get a chance.
http://www.summerfest.com/

Give Pitchfork Music Festival in Chicago, July 13-15, 2012 a try...always a blast plus they have the excellent FLATSTOCK poster show on exhibit.
http://pitchfork.com/festivals/chicago/2012/
http://www.americanposterinstitute.com/flatstock/

Jul. 09 2012 08:08 AM

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