CNN and Fox Drop the Ball on Reporting Health Care Ruling

Friday, June 29, 2012

The top court upheld the health care law Thursday, but initial reports from Fox and CNN outside the Supreme Court said the mandate had been overturned. Second readings revealed that while the commerce clause was deemed a non-valid exercise, a tax measure would be put in place. This meant one thing — the mandate would be upheld.

Fox and CNN then had to backtrack. Brian Stelter joins us today to discuss yesterday’s coverage. Stelter is a media reporter for The New York Times and was following the media’s coverage of yesterday’s events in Washington DC.

Guests:

Brian Stelter

Produced by:

Charlotte Evans

Comments [5]

listener

In fairness, when the mandate was ruled unconstitutional, normally that would have been the final decision.
The media did not count on the bizarre situation of a Chief Justice rewriting the law to barely drag it across the constitutional finish line.

Jun. 29 2012 05:29 PM
Rafael T from USA

A Journalist interviewing a Journalist about other Journalists' errors in judgement is a story interesting only to Other Journalists. "The six minutes that will live in infamy"? Really? Nobody cares. Really.

I think The Takeaway is better than that.

Jun. 29 2012 09:46 AM
Cathy from DC

Not a fan of FOX, but to be fair, my local NPR station got it wrong at first too. Diane Rehm repeated several times that the mandate had been struck down before getting it straight.

Jun. 29 2012 09:30 AM
Assen

I was having a great time listening to WBUR's On Point, listening to the confusion as "ABC declares it upheld, CNN declares it struck down."

Jun. 29 2012 07:07 AM
nevin brown

CNN should confirm there resources get it right the first time!!!!

Jun. 28 2012 10:44 PM

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