Obama Invokes Executive Privilege, Holder Contempt Vote Proceeds

Thursday, June 21, 2012

Attorney General Eric Holder (R) and FBI Director Robert Mueller (L) announce a plot was foiled involving men allegedly linked to the Iranian government to kill the Saudi ambassador to the U.S. (Win McNamee/Getty Images/Getty)

The House Oversight and Government Reform Committee voted yesterday to proceed with a full congressional vote to hold Eric Holder in contempt of congress, despite President Obama's decision to invoke executive privilege on documents pertaining to the "fast and furious" case. It was the first time Obama invoked the privilege during his presidency, and the two political parties have competing narratives for why he did so.

Todd Zwillich is the Takeaway Washington Correspondent and Allan Lichtman is a presidential historian and a Distinguished Professor of History at American University. They discuss whether Obama's decision was a political move to stall the proceedings against Attorney General Eric Holder, or if the administration was actually hiding their involvement in the operation.

Guests:

Allan Lichtman and Todd Zwillich

Produced by:

John Light

Comments [2]

listener

"That's an overdramatic simplification"

As we mark the 40th anniversary of Watergate where there were no casualties the media are highly dismissive of this scandal where many lives were lost in Mexico with the administration now clearly trying to cover something up.

"You may have remembered it" because the media has been carefully avoiding it. Perhaps the public will bypass the media filter and educate themselves and come to their own conclusions about what is important.

Jun. 21 2012 08:31 AM
Ed from Larchmont

They've been asking for documents for 11 months, then there were subpoenas, which were ignored. No one wanted this, but here it is.

Jun. 21 2012 06:12 AM

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