Romney and Obama to Speak Back to Back at Latino Political Conference

Wednesday, June 20, 2012

Republican presidential candidate and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney speaks during a campaign event in St. Louis, Missouri. (Getty)

On Thursday, Mitt Romney will address the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials. It's an annual conference with a long history of hosting presidential hopefuls seeking to pitch themselves to the Latino community. President Obama will speak at the conference on Friday.

Mitt Romney’s challenge will be to find some way to contend with Obama’s announcement last Friday that undocumented immigrant youth will be able to stay in the United States and have the opportunity to apply for work permits.

DeeDee Garcia Blase and Sylvia F. Garcia discuss Mitt Romney’s predicament. Blase is a founding member of the National Tequila Party, a female-led, bipartisan, Latino political group. Blase was formerly president of Somos Republicanos. Garcia was the national hispanic inclusion director for Newt Gingrich’s bid for the Republican nomination.

Guests:

Sylvia Garcia and DeeDee Garcia Blase

Produced by:

John Light

Comments [2]

oscar from ny

Syria has a church specifically made to worship baal somewhere in the desert...they need to send a drone to destroy this temple if syria wants stabilization..

Jun. 20 2012 03:34 PM
listener

Notice how journalists suddenly get shy about discussing social issues and the Latino vote.

Why no mention of Latino opinion on abortion rights, contraception, same-sex marriage and the administration's unconstitutional confrontation with the Catholic Church and the legal actions place which seem to be a taboo topic in the major media?

Isn't all of that contrary to the media political narrative and therefore ignored which insults the intelligence of the audience?

Jun. 20 2012 08:50 AM

Leave a Comment

Register for your own account so you can vote on comments, save your favorites, and more. Learn more.
Please stay on topic, be civil, and be brief.
Email addresses are never displayed, but they are required to confirm your comments. Names are displayed with all comments. We reserve the right to edit any comments posted on this site. Please read the Comment Guidelines before posting. By leaving a comment, you agree to New York Public Radio's Privacy Policy and Terms Of Use.