You'll Need A License For That

Thursday, June 14, 2012

 A.K. Burns and Katherine Hubbard's A.K. Burns and Katherine Hubbard's "Brown Bear," in which artists transformed Recess into a hair salon. (Courtesy of Nick Johnson at Recess.)

Today, about 30 percent of Americans’ jobs require licenses: hair dressing, interior design, earth drilling, even floristry in some states. It’s a percentage that’s on the rise. 

Professional licenses can promote high standards and excellence in health and safety. But in our turbulent economy, where the unemployed turn to the service industry for work, regulation is often a burden. Obtaining a license can be expensive and take years of training, just like studying for a college degree. 

Morris Kleiner is a professor at the Humphrey School of Public Affairs at the University of Minnesota and author of the book Licensing Occupations: Ensuring Quality or Restricting Competition. Lance Lappin is a hair stylist and salon owner based in Manhattan.

Guests:

Professor Morris Kleiner and Lance Lappin

Produced by:

Rebecca Klein and Paul R. Smith

Comments [2]

Philip Greenberg from Denver

Your story this morning reminds of a quote by George Bernard Shaw, "All professions are conspiracies against the laity".

Jun. 14 2012 09:30 AM
Edward Burke

I had not had my coffee, but I think I heard Professor Kleiner say he'd been recently to "Wales, in England". I assure you, Producers and Hosts: Wales is NOT in England. Wales may be perforce a constituent of the United Kingdom, but Wales is NOT in England. (You may care to assist the good professor with his political geography.)

Jun. 14 2012 09:20 AM

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