New York City Plans a Ban of Oversized Sugary Drinks

Thursday, May 31, 2012

New York City plans to ban the sale of large sugary drinks, announced Mayor Michael Bloomberg on Wednesday. The ban, which aims to fight obesity, would impose a 16-ounce limit on the size of sweetened drinks sold at restaurants, bodegas, and movie theaters. Joining us is Marion Nestle, professor of nutrition at New York University and author of "Safe Food: The Politics of Food Safety." Also with us is Jay Cowit, Takeaway Technical Director and Chief Soda Correspondent.

Guests:

Jay Cowit and Marion Nestle

Produced by:

Javier Guzman

Comments [1]

stuart from manhattan

Mayor Bloomberg is the classic example of "Do as I say, not as I do". The voters of NYC decided that a mayor can serve only two terms, but since this mayor is above the law, he lobbied the City Council and received a third term. The city's heliport has strict restrictions on the times it can be used so as not to bother local residents on nights and weekends, but the mayor has no problem traveling during those forbidden hours with his girlfriend and a dog in tow (he's claiming it was business related trips). The mayor has recently purchased another large home (he has 5 or 6 around the world) in the northern suburbs, beyond the city limits, where he can get around this new proposal and drink all the large beverages he wants. My elementary school age kids have tasted soda, and think it's yucky, which means more soda for me. If the mayor wants a ban, let him put an age limit on it, like there is on cigarettes.

May. 31 2012 05:44 PM

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