Unemployment Benefits Will Expire Earlier Than Many Expected

Wednesday, May 30, 2012

Federal unemployment benefits were meant to tide over those who lost their jobs until the economy improved — for up to 99 weeks if necessary. But it remains unclear whether or not the economy is improving, and in February Congress renewed the program. But that renewal came with a caveat: fewer weeks of aid. Next month, 70,000 people will be cut off from unemployment before their 99 weeks are up, and nearly 500,000 will have lost aid this year earlier than they expected.

Christine Owens, the Executive Director of the National Employment Law Project, discusses the ways in which fewer weeks of aid will impact unemployed Americans. Joe Sangataldo, an unemployed resident of New Jersey, will lose his benefits within the next few months.

Guests:

Christine Owens and Joe Sangataldo

Produced by:

John Light

Comments [1]

spnyc from NYC

I don't want to learn how to make my UI check stretch further. I already live on oatmeal, or just skip meals, don't travel, don't eat out or have a child-free social life, don't buy clothes or shoes for myself, wear prescription glasses that should have been renewed 2 years ago, I don't go to beauty salons, I haven't renewed my drivers license or my passport--all the little expenses that working people take care of without a second thought. I want a decent paying job! I had a screening interview with a headhunter just yesterday for an excellent job that I am 100% qualified to do. She agreed that my resume is impressive and that I presented well during our phone conversation. One stumbling block, according to her: I am not currently employed... How am I ever going to bring my family back out of the poverty we have been living in for 3 years if "I can't get a job because I haven't got a job"!
I am 50 years old this year, I have a child in elementary school. She began her life in comfort, now I am raising her in poverty. As long as this discrimination against the long-term unemployed continues, she faces all the social problems I thought my education, my professional experience and my hard work would avoid.

May. 30 2012 09:56 AM

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