The Secret World of Espionage Comes to New York

Friday, May 25, 2012

The ice ax used to murder Leon Trotsky. The ice ax used to murder Leon Trotsky. (The Secret World of Espionage)

John Hockenberry visits the new spying exhibit at the Discovery Center in Times Square. He peruses hundreds of artifacts from the CIA, FBI, and National Reconnaissance Office with Tim Weiner, Pulitzer Prize-winning author and former New York Times reporter who wrote the definitive history of the CIA.

The Secret World of Espionage

Charlie the Catfish, one of two CIA robotic catfish.

The Secret World of Espionage

The handcuffs used to take Anna Chapman into custody.

The Secret World of Espionage

An enigma cypher machine.

The Secret World of Espionage

A fake flying bug developed by the CIA in the 1970s for surveillance.

The Secret World of Espionage

An umbrella tip used for administering poison.

The Secret World of Espionage

A kit of tools used by the Stasi, the state security force of East Germany.

The ice ax used to murder Leon Trotsky.
The Secret World of Espionage
The ice ax used to murder Leon Trotsky.

The ice ax used to kill Leon Trotsky.

Produced by:

Rupert Allman

Comments [2]

CE Lathrop

Tim Weiner did not write "the definitive history of the CIA," he wrote a factually inaccurate book that has been widely criticized. The criticism resulted in his being denied the Pulitzer Prize for this book. A much better book on US intelligence is Christopher Andrew's acclaimed For the President's Eyes Only.

May. 30 2012 01:10 PM
R D Harmony from Oklahoma City

I WOULD LIKE TO EAVESDROP .......

On a few conference calls of our world wide network of tax payer supported snoopers, who in the great and growing complexes just north of DC in Maryland (and at undisclosed locations in every other major USA city) are combing through electronic communications.

In addition to "what did they know and when did they know it?" I specifically want to know enough to spoil their unconstitutional plans.

Thank you.

May. 25 2012 11:23 AM

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