Egypt's Youth and Today's Historic Presidential Election

Wednesday, May 23, 2012

Egyptian demonstrators protest in central Cairo amidst tear gas fire by Egyptian police to demand the ouster of President Hosni Mubarak and calling for reforms on January 25, 2011. (Mohammed Abed/AFP/Getty)

History will be made in Egypt today, and the country’s political future will be determined. Egyptians are heading to the polls to elect a new president after an extraordinary 15 months that saw revolution, violence, and upheaval.

Noel King, a freelance journalist in Egypt, joins to talk about the country's youth vote.

Guests:

Noel King

Produced by:

Marc Kilstein

Comments [2]

Nancy Yousef

Hi friends, There are a couple of interesting, articulate voices you might want to include, in part because there is also a romantic story line. Hossam El-Hamalawy--super smart, articulate uncompromising journalist-activist--recently married Gigi Ibrahim--young, very effective citizen journalist during the revolution. They both represent the youth vanguard--the part of the revolution many of us admired because of its secularism and idealism--and both, as far as I can tell--remain radical but not to the point of not voting. I'd love to see/ hear a piece about these two. Best, Nancy

Nancy Yousef

May. 24 2012 03:21 PM
listener

No such pretentiously sonorous emoting from the media for the Iraqi elections in 2005.

Iraqi voters risked their lives after emerging from the most suffocating tyranny in modern times and thus began the Arab Spring which today is celebrated by western "progressive" who tried their best to keep Iraqis in slavery.

Where were the calls for democracy in that region a decade ago when it was most needed not so popular?
Spare us the dramatic posing which has more to do with the US election than the Egyptian election.

May. 23 2012 10:01 AM

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