Over Fifty and Unemployed

Tuesday, May 22, 2012

In study after study, we’re told that the economic recovery is real. Unemployment is dropping. Spending is up. But tell that to unemployed Americans over 55. More than half of jobless seniors, about 1.1 million people, have been unemployed for more than six months, up from 23 percent four years ago, according to a government report released last week.

But these aren’t just numbers — they’re people all over the country. David Kurtzer is 56-years-old and has been out of work for about two months after over a decade in technology marketing. He would love another senior level technology marketing position. Susan Price is 52-years-old, and was unemployed for all of 2009 and again from September 2010 to May 2011. She has since landed a job as a project manager in the pharmaceutical industry.

Guests:

David Kurtzer and Susan Price

Produced by:

Zachary Dinerstein and Kristen Meinzer

Comments [6]

Susan Marshall from Philadelphia, PA

I will be 58 in January 2013. I, too, have been the victim of age discrimination. Despite having been in the legal field for over 30 years, my kind of experience is not desirous of today's law firms or too costly, even though they are well-aware of the age discrimination laws. Their response? Prove it. I have been without income since September 2012. I cannot get unemployment as I worked for 1.5 years as an independent contractor for a former employer who I should have known could care less about a loyal employee. My contract was terminated without warning leaving me financially destitute. Food stamps help, but not with rent, phone, internet, insurance, personal hygiene necessities, utility bills, etc. Penna. has done away with cash assistance, and LIHEAP is currently out of funds as are the crisis charities. This country is in far worse shape than statistics show and I don't see recovery any time soon, at least not for people my age. What are we all supposed to do? Crawl in a hole and die?

Nov. 05 2012 10:15 AM
Julie from Minnesota

I'm 55 and have gotten recent interviews, but no offers of employment. Yesterday, the interviewer mentioned the hardworking "young gals" in the department and that they had other people scheduled to interview. I am fit and energetic and not ready for the scrap heap. I've been working temporary jobs and have encountered some very harsh mistreatment by a few co-workers.

May. 30 2012 10:15 AM

"Listener" the Troll has struck again. You can't get enough of hiding behind anonymity and spewing lies, can you?

Nothing happens immediately in government, and that's even more true when we talk about the economy.

May. 23 2012 09:56 AM
listener

"Unemployment is dropping".
The work force is shrinking and the U6 rate gives the true picture. The moment Mitt Romney is sworn in all the phony excuses in the media will instantaneously evaporate and results will be expect immediately.
Until then the tiresomely partisan media will pour water down the back of the public and tell them its raining.

May. 22 2012 10:42 AM
Sue Barber from Port Huron, Michigan

To a large extent, the interview missed the point. Workers past the age of 55, and certainly north of 60, are systematically being eliminated by employers. Age discrimination may be illegal, but it is very much alive, well and thriving. Once out of the workforce, getting back in is exceedingly difficult, leading to the country's having a huge number of experienced, productive people who are too old to rehire and too young to retire. These are people who want and usually need, for financial reasons, to keep working. According to the recent GAO report on this subject, the options are limited and bad -- taking Social Security too early and giving up money, exhausting meager personal retirement funds, selling homes at a huge loss. This growing phenomenon is a real financial timebomb for the economy.

May. 22 2012 08:56 AM
Peg

Wondering why we are considering keeping Americans on the job till 70+ when we're having trouble keeping them employed after 50.

May. 22 2012 06:09 AM

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