Chen Guangcheng's Impact from Abroad

Monday, May 21, 2012

Chinese dissident Chen Guangcheng arrived in New York to a throng of cheering supporters on Saturday. He will soon begin a fellowship at New York University Law School's U.S.-Asia Law Institute, and he spoke to the crowd at NYU about his plight: "After much turbulence, I have come out of Shandong," he said, through an interpreter. "This is thanks to the assistance of many friends."

After seven years under house arrest, Chen is no doubt enjoying his freedom. But how much of an impact will the Chinese dissident have from abroad? How will his influence in China change, now that he's in the United States? What do the Chinese public know about this story — and will they be able to follow Chen's progress under China's strict media censorship?

Bob Fu is a Chinese human rights activist and pastor, living in the United States. He was instrumental in publicizing Chen Guangcheng's case and helped negotiate his release.

Guests:

Bob Fu

Produced by:

Jillian Weinberger

Comments [3]

Mary Wilson from US

USA should help its own citizen illegally blocked in China for 4 years come home!!!
https://www.change.org/petitions/help-my-father-dr-zhicheng-hu-come-home

May. 21 2012 07:31 PM
Mary Wilson from USA

USA should help its own citizen illegally blocked in China for 4 years come home!!!
https://www.change.org/petitions/help-my-father-dr-zhicheng-hu-come-home

May. 21 2012 07:30 PM
Ed from Larchmont

It was ironic that Mr. Chen, who protested against China's inhuman and brutal one child policy, needed help from Secretary Clinton, who has peddled abortion rights around the world and hasn't protested China's one-child policy.

Since the one-child policy has affected every family in China, the government fears a mass protest against this policy, perhaps set off by Mr. Chen.

Mr. Chen, perhaps the Andrei Sakorov of China, is here, but his extended family and his lawyers and assistants have been beaten and are in danger in China.

May. 21 2012 06:09 AM

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