The Minority is Now the Majority: Analyzing the US Census Data

Thursday, May 17, 2012

The headline will surprise very few, but it is now official: More than half the babies born in the U.S. last year were not white but either Latino, Black, Asian or from some other minority. The new report from the U.S. Census Bureau tell us more about how far and how fast our country is changing.

Produced by:

Rupert Allman

Comments [7]

That should say 'divisiveness,' not 'decisiveness.'

May. 18 2012 07:15 AM

@"Listener": Wow, could you be more wrong? Try understanding history before just regurgitating something you read in a Tea Party pamphlet. The "racial" issues in this country began in the late 17th century when land owners began endowing certain liberties on White indentured servants over African slaves in order to avoid more rebellions. This lead directly to the structural racism of the United States.

All through history, the power class has used the decisiveness of race and culture to divide and conquer and lower class rebellion. This is a lesson well learned by the old Southern Democrats and current Republicans.

May. 18 2012 07:13 AM
Shawn from Oklahoma

Not having seen a precise definition I checked out the news release at www.census.gov and read the following:
"The U.S. Census Bureau today released a set of estimates showing that 50.4 percent of our nation's population younger than age 1 were minorities as of July 1, 2011. This is up from 49.5 percent from the 2010 Census taken April 1, 2010. A minority is anyone who is not single-race white and not Hispanic.". I'm still not sure what that means except that I know my children (adults now) must be considered a minority because though my heritage is Irish, their father is Filipino. But if their father was Hispanic or Native American, then how would they be counted? At any rate, the melting pot seems to be doing its job.

May. 17 2012 11:37 AM
listener

During the immigration boom of the late 19th and 20th Century the race and power obsessed Democratic Party machines of this nation with sputtering excitement targeted Irish, Italian and Jewish immigrants for recruitment.
Then like now they did this by pitting them against each other with promises and patronage but thankfully many immigrants had no desire to turn their new nation into the statist and oppressive basket cases they departed.

Apparently little has changed in the race and power obsessed Democratic Party as latinos, asians and others realize the lies of "progressives" and make their transition to conservative principles.
What ever language they speak they know con artists when they hear them who seek to take more of the money they earn.

May. 17 2012 10:42 AM
Angel from Miami, FL

More Celeste Headlees!

May. 17 2012 09:38 AM
carl, queens, n.y.

during a recent condo meeting, two unit owners started yapping in russian, i immediately reminded them that this is america, SPEAK SPANISH!

May. 17 2012 09:21 AM

I grew up in a small, mostly Irish/Catholic neighborhood in South Brooklyn which had it's fair share of racial turmoil. It wasn't until my High School years that I shared a classroom with students of more than one cultural background, and even then it was mostly Italian and Greek. For the most part, I had what I considered a typical view of other backgrounds. I thought people who invoked racial distinctions were just whining and that America's Meritocracy was completely just.

It wasn't until my College years when I began to have more than just a cursory understanding of the plight of non-whites in this country. Hopefully, the changing demographics will bring a paradigm shift in the understanding of race and racial issues in this country.

May. 17 2012 09:05 AM

Leave a Comment

Register for your own account so you can vote on comments, save your favorites, and more. Learn more.
Please stay on topic, be civil, and be brief.
Email addresses are never displayed, but they are required to confirm your comments. Names are displayed with all comments. We reserve the right to edit any comments posted on this site. Please read the Comment Guidelines before posting. By leaving a comment, you agree to New York Public Radio's Privacy Policy and Terms Of Use.