Watching and Judging: The Guantanamo Trial of Khalid Sheikh Mohammed

Monday, May 07, 2012

September 11 self-proclaimed mastermind Khalid Sheikh Mohammed is on trial before a Guantanamo Bay military tribunal. But by day one the arraignment hearing was already hitting some snags. All of the 9/11 suspects refused to enter pleas on the charges of orchestrating the September 11 terrorist attacks. Many refused to wear the headsets to hear the translation of the trial. If found guilty, the men could face the death penalty. 

But the defendants aren’t the only ones being judged during this trial. Regardless of outcome, the trial will also have great consequences for how people around the world view American justice. Col. Morris Davis was chief prosecutor for the military commission at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, from 2005 to 2007. Col. Davis is a retired U.S. Air Force colonel. He also teaches legal writing at Howard University Law School in Washington, D.C. Carol Rosenberg is a reporter for the Miami Herald who attended the hearings at Guantanamo Bay.

Guests:

Colonel Morris Davis and Carol Rosenberg

Produced by:

Shia Levitt

Comments [3]

salim from KAMPALA

IF AT ALL SHEIKH CLAIMS HE PLANNED THE ATTACK EXAMINE CAREFUL WHAT WERE HIS MOTIVES AND SUBJECT HIM TO MEDICAL CHECKUPS SUCH THAT YOU DO EVERY THING CONCLUSIVELY TO AVOID BLAMES WHICH MAY COME LATER.

May. 07 2012 04:52 PM
listener

Nothing suggests that these disruptive tactics would not have happened in a civilian trial in New York with even more media attention in a vulnerable city rather than a US military base.

"Embarrassed by the treatment we afforded to them.."
Are we embarrassed about finding OBL since the information about him and his terrorist plots came from interrogation and rendition. Those were tactics this administration rejected but is now happy to take credit for and the results it gleaned.
Is it not infantile to want CIA officers to be prosecuted for getting that information and classified information released in a trial while cheering the finding of OBL?

In 1942 German terrorists were captured in the United States before they carried out any action.
How did FDR treat those defendants?

May. 07 2012 11:09 AM
Ed from Larchmont

I don't really understand why the defendants' cooperation is needed. But as in any court, the defendants can refuse to participate if they choose - the evidence is presented, a judgement is made, and if guilty, a sentence is passed.

It is predictable that as Muslims they would be indifferent and dismissive of the U.S. legal proceedings.

May. 07 2012 08:13 AM

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