The Middling Economic Recovery and the Road to the Presidential Election

Friday, April 27, 2012

President Barack Obama makes remarks on the economy at a fire station in Arlington, Virginia. (Getty)

It’s been a week of mixed economic news. Gas prices are down; jobless claims are up; pending housing sales are up. While it's been hard to put a finger on whether the recovery is progressing or stumbling, it is clear that as presidential campaigning pushes into full swing, talk about the economy will only grow heated. This may particularly be the case in the 14 states expected to be "swing states" this election: job growth in swing states has been well below the national average for job growth around the rest of the U.S. this past year, and that could be a major cause for concern for President Obama come this November.

Motoko Rich, economics reporter for our partner The New York Times explains the latest economic numbers, and what to look for in the months ahead.

Guests:

Motoko Rich

Produced by:

Mythili Rao

Comments [1]

Jessie Henshaw from way uptown

It's so strange how completely idiotic these discussions are, going on and on and on attempting to fathom the strange behaviors of the economy as a social phenomenon, completely ignoring that (strange to you maybe) fact that the economy needs to use the natural world (possibly now creating massive resistance to everyone's competing uses).

What the heck is up? You are presenting us with what amounts to little more than mindless gossip about about our genuine life and death struggle for survival here.

Apr. 27 2012 08:18 AM

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