US to Escalate Drone Campaign in Yemen

Friday, April 27, 2012

Drone (US Air Force/Wikipedia Commons)

The CIA and the Pentagon have been granted new and broader authority to carry out drone strikes in Yemen. The Obama Administration reportedly approved the clandestine campaign's expansion earlier this month, reflecting growing concern over Yemen being a safe haven for Al Qaeda operatives.

In recent months, an affiliate of the terrorist network has strengthened their foothold in southern Yemen as the result of turmoil and unrest plaguing the region. The affiliate has been linked to a series of terrorist plots against the United States.

Greg Miller, national security correspondent for The Washington Post has been covering these recent developments and joins us to explain what this policy shift will mean for the U.S.'s overseas drone campaign.

Guests:

Greg Miller

Produced by:

Marc Kilstein

Comments [1]

Max from Martinsburg, WV

I don't know why I never thought of this before today, but the idea that the CIA could target "unknown" people with drone strikes made me think about how we as Americans would react if the tables were turned. I imagined the fear and uncertainty that must go through the minds of the citizant of these countries. We wouldn't put up with these types of drone strikes against people in our own country from foreign governments even if they were a threat. I hope the us is acting in concert with countries like Yemen to ensure public safety and opinion of us foreign relations remain high.

Apr. 27 2012 07:14 AM

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