Former BP Engineer Arrested in Connection with Gulf of Mexico Spill

Wednesday, April 25, 2012

The explosion aboard the offshore oil rig Deepwater Horizon caused the infamous BP oil spill. (Wikimedia Commons)

More than two years after the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig explosion that killed 11 workers and caused millions of barrels of oil to spill into the Gulf of Mexico, federal authorities have arrested Kurt Mix, a former BP engineer. Mix was among those tasked with monitoring and stopping the leaking oil; he is is accused of destroying evidence showing exactly what the company knew about why attempts to seal the leak were failing. John Schwartz is a national legal correspondent for Takeaway partner The New York Times has been reporting on the story.

Guests:

John Schwartz

Produced by:

Mythili Rao

Comments [1]

Charles

Why do public radio personalities keep talking about how there might "finally" be some arrests made in connection with the explosion of the Deppwater Horizon? As though it has just been a matter of time until a criminnal case could be made.

Previously, I had thought it all was just a tragic accident. And that there may have been some negligence, which was already the subject of civil litigation, but nothing more.

Now, with this arrest, we see that authorities are still not supplying any information that would lead to any criminal charges in connection with the original accident. Instead they are charging a person with destroying electronic messages, after the spill, about the size of the spill. Nothing, in other words, about the cause of the disaster itself.

I get the strong impression -- and I don't think I am being overly sensitivie to his language -- that Todd Zwillich will be disappointed if there are no more criminal charges. Is that really Todd's job as a reporter? To be a cheerleader for prosecutors?

Apr. 25 2012 11:16 AM

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