How Far Should States Be Able to Go to Stop Illegal Immigration?

Wednesday, April 25, 2012

Today the Supreme Court will consider whether Arizona’s approach to illegal immigration clashes with federal law. If they decide it does, what else will states be able do to address their concerns over illegal immigration?

Cecillia Wang thinks there’s already the framework in place for states to limit illegal immigration. Wang is the director of the Immigrants’ Rights Project at the American Civil Liberties Union. She joins us from the Supreme Courthouse in Washington.

Heather MacDonald believes that states should be given more opportunities to protect themselves against illegal immigration. A senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute, she’s a co-author of "The Immigration Solution: A Better Plan Than Today's."

 

Guests:

Heather MacDonald and Cecillia Wang

Produced by:

Kristen Meinzer

Comments [2]

Michael Meric

Very interesting discussion. I disagree with Ms. MacDonald and feel that there is simply no way that profiling will not occur during routine law enforcement stops. The only way this could work is if the immigration status of every single person stopped is checked - and this will create other problems.

I also think that if Arizona feels it can act on matters like immigration traditionally the pervue of the federal government, they should go all the way and send a delegation to Mexico to discuss the issues endemic to that country which cause all the illegal immigration.

Apr. 25 2012 09:56 AM
dan long from UPState NY

Stop calling people like Kovacs and Rove Architects. It's bad enough we have IT people calling themselves that. If this doesn't stop we may take their jobs -- they pay better anyway.

Apr. 25 2012 08:14 AM

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