How Ann Romney Shapes Mitt's Campaign

Friday, April 13, 2012

Mitt Romney and his wife Ann greet the crowd gathered at election night headquarters inside the Tampa Convention Center. (Paul J. Richards/Getty)

Whether or not it was fair for Hilary Rosen to blast Ann Romney’s career, it’s clear that the Romney campaign isn’t taking the issue lightly. Ann Romney went on Fox News yesterday to defend herself — and she quickly pivoted from defense to offense with a plug for her husband and his family values. New York Times reporter Jodi Kantor has written about Ann Romney on the campaign trail in the past, and she weighs in now on the image the candidate's wife is shaping for the next phase of the campaign.

Guests:

Jodi Kantor

Produced by:

Brad Mielke

Comments [3]

Rosen's comment was thoughtless, but has anyone asked how many paid staff the Romney's have helping out around the house?

Apr. 13 2012 02:21 PM
listener

"A plug for her husband"
A plug?
It's called a political campaign or is that to be denied with only one side allowed to raise a billion dollars and use the Presidency to launch vicious smears and gimmicks to distract the public with no defensive response?

"Political operatives kinda sorta drumming up a fight between different groups of women for political gain..."

Where was this sanctimonious exasperation in the last few months and the last few years?
Does it take the left going to far with their manufactured, divisive and defamatory rhetoric for the media to than make a hasty and inaccurate moral equivalency for partisan damage control?

A dishonest and defamatory narrative has turned on the DNC and that is usually called poetic and political justice.

Apr. 13 2012 09:55 AM
Pat from Detroit

Republicans say any woman who raises children works hard. Do they feel that way about welfare moms?

Apr. 13 2012 08:52 AM

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