Trayvon Martin Story Echoed in New Play

Friday, April 13, 2012

The new play Slip/Shot opens tonight in Philadelphia. The play is set in 1962, at Florida State University in Tallahassee, and centers on the case of a 17-year-old African-American boy. The boy is unarmed, walking home from his girlfriend's late at night, when he is shot and killed by a white security guard. The local sheriff declines to press charges, and the security guard walks free. The story of Slip/Shot directly parallels the Trayvon Martin case, but playwright Jacqueline Goldfinger started working on the play months before the world had ever heard of Trayvon or George Zimmerman. And while Slip/Shot is set in the midst of the civil rights movement, its themes easily resonate today. 

Jacqueline Goldfinger is the author of the new play, Slip/Shot.

Guests:

Jacqueline Goldfinger

Produced by:

Jillian Weinberger

Comments [1]

T. Smith from fl

George will never get a fair trial until the media presents the actual facts. Based on the initial media reports I wanted Zimmerman arrested as well, until i began to get more info. I don't know who was at guilt but:
The posted photos are 5 years old.
Trayvon is 6'1", with a grill, and the tag name: NO LIMIT NI**A
Trayvon is seen refereeing fight club videos on youtube.
Zimmerman did not pursue Trayvon. When he was told to stop he did, he tried to return to his truck.
Trayvon spotted him and came back and confronted him.
There is a witness that saw Trayvon on top of George.
Scittles and tea is street slang for pot and ecstacy(spell)
Trayvon was on his third school suspension for 10 days for drugs and theft- he had a burgler's tool and stolen items in his backpack when they searched for drugs.
The bottom, line the media is not relating the complete story. I don't know why, but how can George get a fair trial?

Apr. 13 2012 09:26 AM

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