Remembering Mike Wallace

Monday, April 09, 2012

CBS News correspondent Mike Wallace died this weekend in New Canaan, Connecticut. He was 93. Wallace was one of the original co-hosts for CBS’ "60 Minutes" when it debuted in 1968. In his nearly four decades with the program, he became one of the country’s best-known broadcast journalists. He interviewed everyone from Louis Farrakahn to Roger Clemens and even Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad. Former CBS Moscow Bureau Chief Beth Knobel co-authored the book "Heat and Light: Advice for the Next Generation of Journalists" with Wallace. She remembers Wallace not just as pioneering broadcast journalist — but as a warm, inspired colleague.

Guests:

Beth Knobel

Produced by:

Mythili Rao

Comments [2]

Emily from Washington State

Favorite Mike Wallace interview? That's the one of Ayn Rand from back in the 50's. He just let her speak, and I got a good idea what she believed. And while I disagreed with her, letting her speak helped me understand her philosophy, and helped me understand modern politics so much better. Mike Wallace was a treasure.

Apr. 09 2012 09:23 AM
BarryL from Detroit

You just mentioned the climate scientist's comment that with so many weather records being broken, it is the equivalent of a baseball player on steroids (breaking homerun records). The whole point of the analogy is that there is more heat in the system--like more steroids in the baseball player's body. So we can't say that any particular homerun is caused by the steroids, or any particular weather record by global warming, but the trend definitely is -- more homeruns, more record heat, is a reflection of more steroids, more heat in the system. Why don't you explain the whole thing on air? Are you afraid to say the words "global warming" or "climate change"?

Apr. 09 2012 08:25 AM

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