Lena Dunham Represents Her Generation with 'Girls'

Monday, April 09, 2012

More than any other medium, the characters we see on television reflect and represent who we are — with some exaggeration, of course. 

In the 1970s, though we might not have agreed with Archie Bunker of "All in the Family," we certainly recognized his struggles. In the 1990s, though their apartments seemed much too big for their budgets, the travails of the "Friends" characters resonated with a generation navigating life and love in their twenties.

But times have changed since then. The glossy world of "Sex and the City" may never have been real, but it seems further from the truth than ever before. Recent college graduates who once flocked to New York for jobs in finance, publishing and the arts are finding themselves making lattes and babysitting to make ends meet. Until now, these once-privileged young men and women were missing from TV. Filmmaker Lena Dunham has set out to change that with her new show, "Girls."

Guests:

Lena Dunham

Produced by:

Jillian Weinberger

Comments [1]

Eileen Baker from Old Saybrook

Not sure if its too late but my vote is for Archie Bunker.

Apr. 06 2014 01:13 AM

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