Stand Your Ground Laws Lead to Rise in Justifiable Homicides, Report Says

Friday, April 06, 2012

Gun Show Held At Pima County, AZ Fairgrounds (Kevork Djansezian/Getty)

Weak gun control laws are to blame for the rise in justifiable homicides, an investigation by The Guardian newspaper concludes. A higher rate of this type of killing occurs when that state has permissive gun laws or Stand Your Ground laws. Harry Enten is a writer for The Guardian.

Guests:

Harry Enten

Produced by:

Rupert Allman

Comments [2]

Philip Birsh from New York

An excellent and thoughtful piece on a very emotional and timely issue. More of the same for this reader please!

Apr. 08 2012 08:48 PM

Your "Stand Your Ground Laws Lead to Rise in Justifiable Homicides" link does not lead to the audio on this topic, it links to the story on Hospital Employment Discrimination Based on BMI.

However, as I recall it, your story seemed to make much of the "fashioned" narrative line that gun possession laws favoring possession together with "stand your ground laws" lead to an increase the number of homicides based on a claim of "justifiable self-defense" So what? Was there an increase in the number of homicides? assaults with a firearm?

It seems that a SYG Law is aimed at clarifying the legal jeopardy for using force, including deadly force, in certain circumstances. Permissive gun possession laws allow citizens to have access to the same tools previously available to criminals. Are there a "parade of 'horribles'" that can be imagined in these circumstances. Of course the man in Connecticut whose family was tortured and slaughtered could speak more to the utility of a firearm than I.

Was there an absolute increase in the number of homicides in the gun possessing-SYG jurisdictions or not? Or has NPR's editing prowess found its way into the "truth" of the stories you purport to report? Can you say "Michael Daisey"?

Apr. 06 2012 10:53 AM

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