1914: The Year That Started A New Cultural Era

Monday, June 30, 2014

(Left to right) A newspaper ad for Winsor McCay's film Gertie the Dinosaur, Charlie Chaplin as the Tramp, cover for a 1914 edition of Edgar Rice Burroughs Tarzan of the Apes (Left to right) An ad for Winsor McCay's film Gertie the Dinosaur, Charlie Chaplin as the Tramp, cover for a 1914 edition of Edgar Rice Burroughs Tarzan of the Apes (Variety/British Film Institute/McClelland, Goodchild, and Stewart/Wikipedia Commons [Public Domain])

The year 1914 is most often associated with the start of World War I. In fact, this past weekend marked 100 years since the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria—an event that set in motion the beginning the "Great War."

See Also: The Assassination That Changed The World

But 1914 was also a year of incredible social and artistic change that jump started the modern cultural era. Animation was invented, blues music went mainstream, and Charlie Chaplin's film character "The Tramp" captivated audiences and ultimately defined the golden age of silent films. 

Studio 360 host Kurt Andersen discusses the lasting impacts of the many cultural innovations of 100 years ago. Studio 360's hour-long special on the cultural happenings from that remarkable year, "Broadcasting Live from 1914," delves into the year's many cultural innovations.

Guests:

Kurt Andersen

Produced by:

Megan Quellhorst

Editors:

T.J. Raphael

Comments [1]

Larry Fisher from Brooklyn, N.Y.

Technology or Machine-ism defines people in 2014.

Jun. 30 2014 02:42 PM

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